Moving in together? Make room for love—literally.

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It turns out having even the tiniest bit more space makes sharing a home with your significant other more pleasant. Modern lighting and design retailer Sofary surveyed over 900 people who live with their partner to find out if sharing a home is as blissful as they hoped it would be.

For starters, Sofary’s survey found the majority (74 percent) of couples’ primary reason for moving in together was that they were ready to take that step. And while that’s all well and good (we love a mature, mutual decision), living together inevitably presents a whole new set of factors there’s no way to see coming until you cohabit 1,500 square feet. For example, both men and women said the most annoying thing about living with their partner is how messy they are—one roomie flaw that can really start to take a toll on any relationship, but especially if you’re sharing a small house or apartment.

While no respondents outright mentioned the size of their home as an influence on their relationship happiness, the survey reveals an interesting parallel between the amount of space couples share and their relationship satisfaction. On average, and across generations, people who responded saying they were satisfied with their relationship had almost 13 percent more space than couples who were dissatisfied. Sofary’s survey results break it down by both generation and square footage:

Baby Boomers living together and satisfied with their relationship share an average of 1,835 square feet; those dissatisfied share 1,733 square feet.

Gen X couples living together and satisfied with their relationship share an average of 1,969 square feet; those dissatisfied share 1,693 square feet.

Millennial couples living together and satisfied with their relationship share an average of 1,810 square feet; those dissatisfied share 1,566 square feet.

The natural conclusion to draw from this tidbit? Even an extra 100 square feet could offer you that much more room to breathe without driving each other nuts (more room for storage!). So if you’re moving in together, it might be smart to prioritize size over fancy amenities or other factors. Compromise is always key when moving in a significant other, but this survey reiterates how crucial it is for couples when space is especially tight.