American Girl Debuts First Korean-American Doll

The company is launching its first Asian-American doll since 2014. 

This content originally appeared on People.

American Girl is introducing a new doll to its ever-growing collection: Z Yang.

“Z” (short for Suzie) is Korean-American and the latest character to join their series of contemporary dolls, representing more diverse backgrounds and creative interests.

Z Yang American Girl Doll

Z Yang is American Girl’s popular stop-motion vlogger character. As the star of the company’s web series, Z’s Crew, Z hails from Seattle and loves staying connected with friends and sharing stories through her stop-motion videos.

“We made Z Korean-American because it’s an ethnicity we haven’t featured before in our character lineups,” American Girl spokesperson Stephanie Spanos tells People. “And, in our research, we found there was a significant Korean-American population living in Seattle, where Z is from.

“Z and the other new contemporary characters give voice to a diverse range of personalities and provide more ways for girls to connect with smart, compelling, and aspirational characters that reflect their interests and experiences today.”

Z is the company’s first Asian-American doll since Ivy Ling was retired by the company in 2014. She stands at 18-inches tall and has long dark-brown hair, warm brown eyes and a beauty mark on her left cheek. She also comes with her own filming accessories, including a camera, smartphone and tripod. The Z collection is available on April 27.

“We think of our dolls and books as both mirrors and windows. When girls own a doll that looks like them it provides a sense of belonging—a mirror where they can see reflected, among other things, a familiar-looking face or a unique culture,” Spanos says. “Equally important, though, is the idea that a doll that may not look like her owner, can become a window into other cultures and backgrounds from which to learn and grow.”

The company also considered girls’ growing interest in filming and connecting with friends when it came to creating Z.

“Like many girls today, Z expresses herself through her art—creating stop motion videos, documentary films and creative storytelling,” Spanos says. “Other inspirational themes in Z’s story that make her special and relatable include her strong connection with friends, her desire to express herself and her sense of humor.”