Biel wants to make everyone feel comfortable talking about their body, starting with her own toddler son, Silas.

By Marisa Cohen
February 09, 2018
Vivien Killilea/Getty Images

Jessica Biel thinks everyone should be talking about sex—in a healthy, positive, and humorous way, that is—and she’s starting with a very young and impressionable audience: Silas, her 2-year-old son with husband Justin Timberlake.

“We're using technical terms and we're talking about when we shower together and this is what I've got, this is what you've got, and you know we just talk about it," she told an audience earlier this week at the 2018 Makers Conference in Los Angeles. "I know he's really young, but I really believe that you start it this early that there's no shame."

“I think I still go back to this idea that it doesn't have to be so serious,” Biel continued. “If you want to laugh and say vagina and laugh or say penis or whatever, well, do it! Laugh and get it out, get the giggles out and then ask the real question that you know you have. I think that's always what happened to me when I was young. It's like you just, you could barely get past the giggles to ask the real question, which was a really probably important question that as a young person you needed to know."

Biel was at the women’s conference (which featured a few other names you may have heard before, such as Hillary Clinton, Jane Fonda, Natalie Portman, director Ava DuVerney, and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg) to announce the launch of Tryst Network, a mom-centric site to educate women about sex and their bodies, using “fun, reliable and empowering online content.” (Check out the hilarious teaser video from Tryst she posted on Instagram, in which she and Chelsea Handler compare how “woke” their vaginas are.)

While talking to a toddler about sex may be a new adventure for Biel, empowering women to take charge of their sexual health has been a passion of hers for years. In 2015, she teamed up with WomanCare Global to make a series of FunnyOrDie.com videos teaching young women about their bodies. “Vaginas are powerful and its time we talk about them,” she said at the time. “It wasn’t long ago that I realized how little I knew about the way my own body worked, and as I started talking to other women, it was clear I wasn’t the only one.”

For now, she's making sure her son doesn't grow up with the same problem.

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