The Best New Books to Read This Month

Whether you’re looking for a new twisting thriller, riveting nonfiction read or a rich foodie memoir, March has something for everyone. Here are this month’s new releases that caught our eye.

1

Close Enough to Touch, by Colleen Oakley

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Photo by amazon.com

From the bestselling author of Before I Go comes the riveting and unconventional love story of Jubilee Jenkins, a woman with an incredibly rare medical condition—she’s allergic to other humans. Because of her condition, she lives the life of a recluse in a small New Jersey town. After her mother’s death, Jubilee finds herself without financial support, forced to leave the world she knows to face the world she’s been hiding from. Outside her home she takes up a job at a local library, where she meets Eric Keegan, a divorcee struggling with a troubled adopted son. Eric becomes fascinated with Jubilee, setting the stage for one of the most thought-provoking love stories of the year.

To buy: $19; amazon.com.

Released March 7.


2

The Confessions of Young Nero, by Margaret George

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Photo by amazon.com

Margaret George is known for vivid historical fiction novels, including Helen of Troy and Elizabeth I, and she doesn’t disappoint with her newest story. In The Confessions of Young Nero, George tells the story of one of the most infamous rulers in history—as told from the character’s own perspective. The first book in this two-part series details the rich history that brought an unlikely 17-year-old boy to the throne of the Roman Empire. Readers will look at Nero in a new light, as George reveals harsh realities of Nero’s childhood, including the cruel intentions of his power-hungry mother.

To buy: $19; amazon.com.

Released March 7.


3

Duck Season: Eating, Drinking and Other Misadventures in Gascony, France’s Last Best Place, by David McAninch

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Photo by amazon.com

In a little-known corner of the south of France, far from the hustle and bustle of Provence, sits Gascony, a land where duck farms are abundant and rich, meaty dishes are the only options on the menu. Author David McAninch, features editor at Chicago magazine, first visited the region while on assignment for a cooking magazine. He fell in love with the area and convinced his wife and young daughter to move there. In this mouthwatering memoir, McAninch recounts the eight months he spent trying to master the region’s ultra-traditional cuisine, divulging juicy tidbits about himself, the food, and the Gasconian way of life.

To buy: $19; amazon.com.

Released March 7.



4

The Fall of Lisa Bellow, by Susan Perabo

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Photo by amazon.com

Meredith Oliver is having enough trouble navigating the mean girls in her eighth grade class when her all-star brother partially loses his sight in a horrible baseball accident. And just when she thinks it can’t get any worse, her world is turned upside-down when she stops in a local deli for a soda. While she waits to pay, an armed robber enters the establishment. The only other customer in the store is Lisa Bellow, the most popular girl in her grade, whom the gunman takes with him as he goes. Told through the incredibly honest eyes of an eighth grade girl and her despairing mother, this moving story touches on tragedy, loss, and what happens to those affected.

To buy: $23; amazon.com.

Released March 14.


5

The Power of Different: The Link Between Disorder and Genius, by Gail Saltz M.D.

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Photo by Flatiron Books

In this fascinating exploration of the psychology of brain “differences,” Dr. Gail Saltz, clinical associate professor of psychiatry at The New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill-Cornell School of Medicine, sets out to explain why serious cognitive struggles can be the origin of an individual’s greatest strengths. She examines famous geniuses afflicted by ADD, anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism, and explains how specific deficits in the brain are directly associated with great talent. An interesting read for both people who struggle with brain differences and those interested in what makes for a brilliant mind.

To buy: $17; amazon.com.

Released March 7.  


6

The Roanoke Girls, by Amy Engel

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Photo by amazon.com

After her mother’s suicide, 15-year-old Lane Roanoke goes to live in Kansas with her grandparents and cousin Allegra. But after discovering a dark secret kept by her family, she runs away, leaving Allegra and her then-boyfriend behind. Eleven years later, her grandfather calls Lane to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Riddled with guilt, Lane agrees to return and help search for the missing girl. As the story weaves back and forth between the present and that fateful summer, Lane navigates through her family’s dark history to understand where Allegra went and how to bring her home again.

To buy: $17; amazon.com.

Released March 7.  



7

Never Let You Go, by Chevy Stevens

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Photo by amazon.com

Lindsey Nash feels like she’s being followed—in fact, she feels like someone may have even been in her home. Could someone from her past be haunting her? Eleven years ago, Lindsey escaped from an abusive relationship and brought her young daughter, Sophie, with her, cutting all ties and starting anew. Her then-husband was even sent to jail. But now, he’s out of prison and, coincidentally, she suddenly feels like someone is watching her. Even her new boyfriend feels threatened. Her ex swears he’s a changed man, but is he? With this chilling novel, the bestselling author of Still Missing delivers another intense thriller that will keep you wondering—could her stalker be closer than she thinks?

To buy: $18; amazon.com.

Released March 14.   


8

The Lucky Ones, by Julianne Pachico

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Photo by amazon.com

This jigsaw puzzle of a book is set in two places—Colombia during the peak of its drug-fueled conflict, and New York City. It tells the story of a group of high school girls and the people and drugs that impact their lives over two decades, including their teachers, parents, housekeepers, and the political warlords who run the world around them. The stories set the scene to understand life in this drug-fueled time where entire families can disappear without a trace, and the line between the “good guys” and the “bad guys” is never quite clear. This captivating novel from Julianne Pachico uses vivid prose to bring to life the intensity of life in war-torn Colombia and the harsh realities of everyday for people who lived through it.

To buy: $17; amazon.com.

Released March 7.   


9

Ill Will, by Don Chaon

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Photo by amazon.com

National Book Award finalist Don Chaon is back with a chilling novel that ties together two unsolved crimes. Dustin Tillman, a psychologist in suburban Cleveland, gets news that his adopted brother Rusty is being released from prison after serving 30 years for murdering their parents. At the same time, one of Dustin’s patients becomes fascinated with a series unexplained drownings. Dustin, too, becomes obsessed, going to all lengths, even putting loved ones in harm’s way, to solve the mystery.

To buy: $21; amazon.com.

Released March 7.   



10

South and West: From a Notebook, by Joan Didion

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Photo by amazon.com

National Book Award-winning author Joan Didion gives readers a glimpse into her mind with never-before-seen excerpts from her own personal notebooks. In the first excerpt, readers travel with Didion on a road trip through Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama in 1970. During the trip she writes about what she learns about race and class from speaking with local business owners and from her own observations. In the second notebook, readers will get an inside look into Didion’s experience covering the 1976 Patty Hearst trial for Rolling Stone. Even though the magazine never published her article, the notes show how the experience shaped Didion’s understanding of the social hierarchy in San Francisco at the time, which paved the way for her later book, Where I Was From. 

To buy: $13; amazon.com.

Released March 7.