The Best New Books to Read This Month

Whether you’re looking for a collection of hilarious essays, a page-turning thriller, or a touching memoir, June has something for everyone. Here are 10 new releases that caught our eye this month.

1

Do Not Become Alarmed: A Novel, by Maile Meloy

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Two cousins take their families on a cruise around Central America at Christmas to escape the stress of their real lives. Once docked, the women and children leave the ship for a zip-lining excursion, and the unthinkable happens—one moment the children are there, and the next they’re gone. Told from the perspectives of both the children and the parents, Meloy’s thrilling novel will make you hold close the people that matter most and question what it means to feel secure.

To buy: $19; amazon.com.

Released June 6.


2

My Glory Was I Had Such Friends: A Memoir, by Amy Silverstein

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Amy Silverstein had a heart transplant at age 25 and lived a full life with a donor heart for 26 years, until the transplant unexpectedly began to fail. Her only chance at living was to search for a new donor—and move across the country to California in the process. When it seemed almost impossible to get through this new, scary time in her life, nine of her friends from different walks of life stepped up to be there. In this inspirational memoir of sickness and health, Silverstein pays tribute to the many women who put their lives on hold when she needed them most.

To buy: $16; amazon.com.

Released June 27.


3

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo: A Novel, by Taylor Jenkins Reid

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Evelyn Hugo, an aging Hollywood icon, decides she is ready to tell the world the truth about her life and commissions reporter Monique Grant for the job. While Monique sees the biography as a way to jump-start her career, she doesn’t realize that she is connected to Evelyn in ways that she could never have imagined. Reid’s characters will enchant readers as they travel through the glitz and glamour of Old Hollywood and the truths they both must confront.

To buy: $18; amazon.com.

Released June 13.



4

Would Everybody Please Stop?: Reflections on Life and Other Bad Ideas, by Jenny Allen

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In this collection of down-to-earth essays, noted comedian and writer Jenny Allen attempts to make sense of the insane world around us. In addition to answering questions like: what’s the point of fat-free half-and-half? And, why do people always say, “it is what it is?” She address the potholes in her life, like becoming a “wig person” while going through chemo, and her shock at finding X-rated images on her daughter’s computer. Allen’s compassionate, yet hilarious essays will resonate with readers and make them appreciate the little things in life.

To buy: $17; amazon.com.

Released June 6.


5

Every Last Lie: A Gripping Novel of Psychological Suspense, by Mary Kubica

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When Clara Solberg's husband and daughter get in a car crash that kills Nick but leaves Maisie unharmed, Clara—and the police—think it is just a terrible accident. But when Maisie begins having nightmares, Clara realizes there might be more to the crash. As she begins to investigate on her own, Clara's findings change her life in unexpected ways. Told from both Nick and Clara’s perspectives—jumping back and forth from the present to the past—Every Last Lie is a captivating whodunit.

To buy: $18; amazon.com.

Released June 27.


6

The Salt House: A Novel, by Lisa Duffy

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This touching novel tells the story of the Kelly family, who live a seemingly idyllic life tending to their lobster business on the coast of Maine. But when their young daughter doesn’t wake up from her afternoon nap, everyone's lives turn upside down. Through alternating voices, Duffy creates an accurate portrayal of the lasting effect of grief and the difficulty of looking toward the future when the past seems so broken.

To buy: $16; amazon.com.

Released June 13.



7

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, by Roxane Gay

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In this honest memoir, Bad Feminist writer Roxane Gay tackles the complexity of nourishing oneself. No stranger to the topic, Gay has frequently written about her weight, her relationship with food as a means of self-care, and the trauma that changed her relationship with eating. Readers will connect with Gay’s vulnerability and her reflections on how society too often ties size to worth.

To buy: $16; amazon.com.

Released June 13.


8

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, by Sherman Alexie

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After his mother passed away, National Book Award-winning author Sherman Alexie was moved to write about their relationship. Through poetry, essays, and family photographs, Alexie brings the reader into his childhood, as a young boy raised by poor, alcoholic parents on an Indian reservation. His stories will make you feel for his mother, as both an intelligent and complicated woman.

To buy: $18; amazon.com.

Released June 13.


9

Wine. All The Time: The Casual Guide to Confident Drinking, by Marissa Ross

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Marissa Ross’ award-winning blog, Wine. All The Time., was the inspiration for this hilarious and down-to-earth handbook for all things vino. Though she's not a trained sommelier (but a comedy writer and wine consumer), Ross' writing is informative, unpretentious, and funny. In her book, she teaches readers about everything from finding a great bottle on a budget to understanding the environmental impact of the wines they choose.

To buy: $14; amazon.com.

Released June 27.



10

A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution, by Jennifer A. Doudna & Samuel H. Sternberg

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If you had the power to control evolution—how would you wield it? Jennifer Doudna was part of the team that developed CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing technology that allows individuals to change the DNA of human embryos. Once she realizes the incredible power that CRISPR brings, she calls for the world to delay use of the program—and her request is shot down. In this riveting account, she tells the story of CRISPR’s controversial development and argues that even the smallest tweaks to human DNA could have unexpected consequences.

To buy: $13; amazon.com.

Released June 18.