The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) released a brand new, online portal discussing race, racism, and racial identity.

By Andrea Romano
Updated June 09, 2020
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This article originally appeared on Travel + Leisure.

Last week, The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) released a brand new, online portal discussing race, racism, and racial identity.

The new web portal, “Talking About Race,” was launched as a way to help everyone, including families and communities, talk about racism and racial identity “and the way these forces shape every aspect of society,” according to a statement by the museum.

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In the statement, the NMAAHC added that it decided to launch the portal, which was originally planned for another date, in response to recent incidents including the deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, as well as the ongoing protests across the country.

“Since opening the museum, the number one question we are asked is how to talk about race, especially with children. We recognize how difficult it is to start that conversation,” said Spencer Crew, interim director of the NMAAHC in a statement on the museum’s website. “But in a nation still struggling with the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow laws, and white supremacy, we must have these tough conversations if we have any hope of turning the page and healing. This new portal is a step in that direction.”

The “Talking About Race” portal provides resources for information and guided discussions, as well as videos, specific questions, and even role-playing exercises to help people “become more comfortable about engaging in honest dialogue and self-reflection,” according to Crew.

The portal is divided into eight subjects, including topics on the historical foundations of race and being anti-racist. The portal is an extension of the work that has been done by the NMAAHC, including published research from activists, historians, and other public figures such as Brené Brown, Robin DiAngelo, Ibram X Kendi, Audre Lorde, Bishop Desmond Tutu, and many more.

For more information or to access the “Talking About Race” portal, visit the NMAAHC website.

This Story Originally Appeared On travelandleisure