The FDA issued a recall for this product over the weekend.

By Lauren Wicks
September 09, 2019
Getty Images

This article originally appeared on EatingWell.

Kroger’s Yellowfin Tuna Steaks and Seasoned Yellowfin Tuna Steaks are being recalled after several consumers reported scombroid poisoning from consuming this product to the FDA. The agency became aware of cases across several Ohio stores and the grocer agreed to remove all tuna steaks from stores that could be affected.

Kroger stores in the following states are affected by the recall: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The products potentially contaminated are all Yellowfin Tuna Steaks with sell-by dates from August 29-September, 14, 2019. The FDA is working with Kroger to ensure all products are removed from the market.

Related: The Ultimate Guide to Preventing Food Poisoning

Scombroid poisoning occurs after one eats spoiled fish that likely haven't been refrigerated properly at some point before serving. This causes the fish to release histamine-containing bacteria, which causes allergy-like reactions such as flushing, facial rashes, diarrhea, sweating and stomach cramps. More serious symptoms include trouble breathing, blurred vision and swelling of the tongue and/or mouth. Symptoms typically begin quickly, within 15 minutes to two hours after consumption of spoiled fish. Those who think they are experiencing symptoms are encouraged to contact their doctor as soon as possible for treatment. The FDA also advises that antihistamines can be used to treat symptoms (but check with your doctor before self diagnosing and medicating).

Consumers are encouraged to check their refrigerators and freezers for this product and if they are in possession of it, may return it to the store of purchase for a full refund. Those with more questions can contact Alfa International at 855-551-0118.

Read more: Are There Really More Food Recalls? The Truth About Food Safety

Advertisement