The childhood business venture is only allowed without a permit in 14 states.

By Mike Pomranz
Updated: June 20, 2019

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine

Maybe you caught the news last week: Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a bill officially legalizing kids’ lemonade stands in the state, a law he described as “common sense” after police had reportedly shut down an enterprising child in the past. If your reaction is “Wait, lemonade stands are illegal?” the lemonade experts at Country Time want you to know that, yes, lemonade stands can be shut down in the vast majority of states across the country — but they’re hoping they can change that.

Country time explains that, by their count, unpermitted lemonade stands are actually legal in only 14 states: Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Illinois, Missouri, Louisiana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Texas, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and California. It’s a list the brand apparently knows well because, last year, they launched their Country Time Legal-Ade campaign that sought to help kids pay permit fees and fines incurred by their stands. This year, inspired by changes like the one made in Texas, Country Time is hoping to be a catalyst to get new legislation passed in the remaining 36 states.

“This summer, Country Time wants to legalize lemonade stands across the country by giving parents and kids the tools to start changing the laws in their state,” the brand writes. “Simply go to www.countrytimelegalade.com to learn if lemonade stands are legal in your state without a permit. If they aren’t, Country Time is helping you start the process by giving you the information to contact your local state representative and providing a downloadable Legal-Ade support yard sign.”

Here’s a flashy video elaborating on the campaign:

In the meantime, Country Time wants kids under 14 years of age to know that Legal-Ade is still up and running, giving their parents the chance to get reimbursed for permits and fines up to $300. Terms and conditions apply on the program, which runs until September 2, details of which can be found at the aforementioned Country Time Legal-Ade website.

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