Rosemary-Honey Prosciutto Crisps

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This charcuterie board favorite goes for a spin in the oven and turns irresistibly crispy.

Rosemary-Honey Prosciutto Crisps
Photo:

Victor Protasio

Prep Time:
10 mins
Total Time:
35 mins
Servings:
10
Yield:
20

Prosciutto, the dry-cured Italian ham usually found thinly sliced and draped on a charcuterie board, gets a crispy makeover to surprise your dinner party guests. You’ll first bake slices of prosciutto until crisp, and then brush them all over with rosemary-infused honey. The sweet-salty combo with an herby touch is the definition of divine simplicity. Show off these prosciutto crisps on a cheese board, or serve them with potato chips and bubbly. Pro tip: Be sure to brush on the herby honey while both the honey and prosciutto are still warm.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. thinly sliced prosciutto (about 20 slices)

  • 2 sprigs rosemary

  • 1/4 cup honey

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Lay prosciutto slices flat on baking sheets in a single layer. Bake prosciutto, in batches if needed, until crisp, 12 to 15 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, place rosemary in a small skillet and cover with honey. Bring to a boil over medium, stirring gently to move rosemary through honey once or twice. Reduce heat to low; simmer until fragrant, about 1 minute. Discard rosemary.

  3. Remove prosciutto from oven and immediately brush lightly with warm honey. If honey thickens as it cools, rewarm over low. (Refrigerate leftover honey for up to 3 weeks.) Let prosciutto cool completely on baking sheets, about 10 minutes.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

71 Calories
2g Fat
7g Carbs
6g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 10
Calories 71
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 2g 2%
Saturated Fat 1g 3%
Cholesterol 16mg 5%
Sodium 611mg 27%
Total Carbohydrate 7g 3%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Total Sugars 7g
Protein 6g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 6mg 0%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 122mg 3%

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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