Most palms enjoy warm temperatures, average humidity, and moderate light—the same conditions that we find comfortable, making them great indoor houseplants.

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Workspace with indoor palm tree

Native to tropical and subtropical climates, palm trees can add a bold, tropical look to home interiors. These plants are from the Arecaceae family and are flowering perennials with varying growth forms. (There are almost 200 known genera with over 2,600 species in the palm family!) Many of the most popular palms are slow-growing and only require occasional attention as long as you provide them with what they need to thrive.

Wondering where to start? Whether you're looking for a tree-like palm that will grow up to 5 feet tall, or the most low-maintenance and easy-to-grow palm available, here are our favorite indoor palm plants all guaranteed to add a tropical feel to your home, plus tips on how to take care of them.

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Parlor Palm
Credit: amazon

Parlor Palm

The Parlor palm (Chamaedorea elegans) is an attractive houseplant beloved for its compact and clumping growth habit that resembles a bamboo forest. It's perhaps the most popular indoor palm and has been cultivated as a houseplant for 50 years. Slow growing and generally easy to grow, the Parlor palm can reach up to 10 to 12 feet in height in its natural habitat, but it tends to stick to 2 to 6 feet tall indoors. This palm can tolerate lower light conditions, but will grow at a slower rate.

Areca Palm
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Areca Palm

Also known as the butterfly or bamboo palm, Areca palms (Dypsis lutescens) make for a lovely focal point in large rooms due to their grand size. Many Areca found at big box garden centers are around 5 feet tall, making them a great choice for those looking for an indoor tree-type plant. This stately palm can grow up to 8 feet tall as long as it gets bright, indirect sunlight, but it can tolerate medium-light areas as well. However, it is sensitive to overwatering, so let the soil dry in between waterings.

Robellini Pygmy Date Palm
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Pygmy Date Palm

Unlike its cousins that can reach heights up to 75 feet in their natural habitat, the Pygmy Date palm (Phoenix roebelenii) is a dwarf species native to southern China. It is also known as the Miniature Date palm and Phoenix palm. It grows 3 to 5 feet tall indoors and features narrow, feathery leaves in glossy green, silvery-green, or dark green. The Pygmy palm is drought tolerant, and it can handle light frosts but not a hard freeze.

Chinese Fan Palm
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Chinese Fan Palm

The Chinese Fan palm (Livistona chinensis) features star-shaped leaves instead of the classical feathery frond leaves seen on most palms. Also known as the Fountain palm, the plant can grow up to 15 feet tall, making a lovely addition for large spaces. There are smaller cultivars, such as the dwarf Chinese Fan palm or Taiwan Fan palm. The Chinese Fan grows best in bright, indirect light, but it can tolerate some shade as well.

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Majesty Palm
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Majesty Palm

This large tropical palm features upward-arching, feathery fronds and a slightly swollen trunk base. The Majesty palm (Ravenea rivularis) is relatively fast-growing, and it can reach heights up to 15 feet when mature. It thrives in bright, indirect light, but it will tolerate some shade. Unlike most drought-tolerant palms, the majesty palms are native to wet areas in Madagascar, so they prefer their soil to stay moist (not waterlogged).

Cascade Palm
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Cascade Palm

The Cascade is a clumping palm with a short trunk, shrubby growth habit, and dark green fronds. Despite its full stature, the Cascade palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum) can reach up to 6 feet tall but can be kept smaller if planted in a smaller container. It's native to the wet lowlands of central America, so it needs consistently moist (not soggy) soil. The Cascade palm does best with bright, indirect light.

Ponytail Palm
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Ponytail Palm

This popular houseplant is known for its attractive foliage that sprouts from a bulbous trunk and resembles a perky ponytail. It's technically part of the Asparagaceae family, and not a true palm, but it has a similar look. Its sturdy trunk helps the plant reserve water, making this houseplant very drought tolerant. The Ponytail palm (Beaucarnea recurvata) thrives in bright, indirect light and doesn't mind staying pot bound. If you want the look of a palm that doesn't get huge and has the least amount of maintenance, the Ponytail is the perfect fit.

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sago palm
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Sago Palm

The Sago palm (Cycas revoluta) is another "non-true" palm that is often grouped with palms. The Sago features stiff fronds that grow from an upright pineapple-looking trunk. Native to southern Japan, the Sago is a slow-growing plant that reaches heights of around 3 feet. They need regular and consistent moisture and bright, indirect sunlight (although they can tolerate some shade).

Yucca palm
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Yucca Palm

The Yucca palm (Yucca elephantipes) is the most tree-like palm available for houseplants. It features thick cane stems with sword-shaped foliage. Grown indoors, the Yucca can reach heights of 5 feet. It's very drought tolerant and will grow in full sun or part shade.

kentia palm
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Kentia Palm

The Kentia palm (Howea forsteriana) tolerates a wide range of conditions. It's shade tolerant, cold tolerant, and won't outgrow most spaces. It's typically sold in clumps of three or more plants to give it a bushy appearance. Once established, it requires very little care making it one of the most low-maintenance and easy-to-grow tropical plants.

How to Grow Indoor Palm Trees and Plants at Home

Although specific growing conditions depend on the palm species, most palms thrive with similar care. Here's a snapshot of how best to care for most indoor palm trees:

  • Light: Most palms thrive in bright, indirect light, but some tolerate partial shade. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight to prevent leaf scorching.
  • Temperature and humidity: Palms prefer average humidity and temperatures between 65 to 75 degrees. Low humidity will cause tips to brown. To help increase humidity indoors, use a cool-mist humidifier or mist the plant regularly with water.
  • Soil: Palms do best in well-draining, slightly acidic, or neutral soil.
  • Watering: Keep soil moist but not waterlogged. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings.
  • Feeding: Use a basic fertilizer once a month during the active growing season.
  • Pruning: Regular pruning helps palms maintain an attractive form and manageable size.
  • Propagation: The easiest method to propagate palms is by division in the spring or when you repot.
  • Pests and diseases: Spider mites, scale insects, and mealybugs are the most common pests of indoor palms.