The 9 Best Duvet Inserts, According to Our In-Depth Testing

Our favorite is the Brooklinen All-Season Down Comforter because it’s constructed with high-quality materials—and it also comes in lightweight and extra-warm options.

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Best Duvet Inserts
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

A duvet insert made from quality materials can make your bed feel exceptionally cozy in any season. To come up with these recommendations, we tested the best duvet inserts and comforters in our Lab and evaluated them on quality, texture, durability, breathability, and value. For expert tips, we tapped Kelly Murray, a certified pediatric and adult sleep coach, as well as Toussaint Derby, lead designer at Havenly.

And while the terms are often used interchangeably, duvet inserts and comforters are technically two different things. The main difference is that a duvet insert is meant to be used with a cover while a comforter is meant to be used alone. However, many products marketed as "comforters" are designed to be used the same way as a duvet insert—and they come with loops to attach a cover.

"One of the best reasons for going with a duvet over a comforter is it allows you to swap out your bedding, whether for seasonal shifts or decor preferences," says Derby. "Simply store duvet covers (they fold nicely and neatly, taking up little to no space). Comforters are more costly to swap, and obviously take up more real estate in your closet."

Our top pick is the Brooklinen All-Season Down Comforter because it's made with high-quality materials and constructed with superior baffle-box stitching, as opposed to the usual box stitching. We also like that you can choose between one of three warmth levels depending on your preferences.

Here are the best duvet inserts and comforters, according to our tests.

Best Overall Duvet Insert: Brooklinen Down Comforter

4.8
Brooklinen Down Comforter

Amazon

Who it's for: People who want a genuine down duvet insert that is available in multiple levels of warmth.

Who it isn't for: People who want a machine-washable duvet insert.

Our testers were thoroughly pleased with the super soft and breathable feel of Brooklinen's genuine down comforter. Made with a baffle-box construction, this pick keeps its fluffy down fill in place, yet allows plenty of room for it to expand and help with thermoregulation. During our testing, we found it to maintain its cool-to-the-touch sensation: The surface temperature of the breathable, 100-percent cotton shell only rose about 2 degrees Fahrenheit after we laid under it for five minutes.

Even though it is marketed as a "comforter," it comes with loops on every corner to attach it to a duvet cover. We tested the all-season version—which has a fill power of 700—and found it to be just right: "[It] feels light and comforting without being heavy and hot," says one tester. The comforter also comes in lightweight and ultra-warm versions, at 650 and 750 fill power, respectively.

Given that this is real-down, the brand suggests spot-cleaning or dry-cleaning the comforter as needed—but the good news is that the coffee stain came out with minimal effort during our tests. This Brooklinen down comforter comes with a higher price tag than many of the down-alternative options on our list, but for real down, it's one of the more reasonably priced options we tested.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Cotton
  • Fill: Down
  • Construction: Baffle-box
  • Fill Power: 650–750
  • Sizes: Twin/twin XL, full/queen, king/California king
  • Care: Spot clean or dry clean

Price at time of publish: From $359 for full/queen

Brooklinen All-Season Down Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Budget Duvet Insert: Utopia Bedding Down Alternative Comforter

Utopia Bedding Down Alternative Comforter

Amazon

Who it's for: People who want an inexpensive duvet insert that can also work as a stand-alone comforter.

Who it isn't for: People who want a duvet insert or comforter made with natural materials.

This affordable comforter from Utopia Bedding is made with siliconized down-alternative fibers that mimic the feel of real down. The fill weight is 250 grams per square meter (GSM), meaning this pick is well-suited for hot sleepers. We found this to be true during our evaluations—testers described the comforter as soft, light, and breathable.

The shell is made from easy-to-clean microfiber, so the coffee stain lifted with ease in our testing. But if you have particularly stubborn messes, the comforter is entirely machine-washable. The box-stitch construction ensures the fill does not shift throughout the night, although it's not as lofty as a baffle-box comforter—a trade-off that comes with lower-priced comforters.

The Utopia Bedding Down-Alternative Comforter is available in seven different colors, so you can choose to forego a duvet cover (although it does come with corner loops to tie on a cover). Most impressive of all, this pick was one of the least expensive out of the 34 duvet inserts we tested.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Microfiber
  • Fill: Siliconized hollow fiber
  • Construction: Box-stitch
  • Sizes: Twin, twin XL, full, queen, king, California king
  • Care: Machine-washable

Price at time of publish: From $28 for queen

Utopia Bedding Down-Alternative Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Splurge Duvet Insert: Feathered Friends Bavarian 700 Down Comforter

5
Feathered Friends Bavarian 700 Down Comforter

Feathered Friends

Who it's for: People who want a genuine down duvet that's exceptionally plush and lofty.

Who it isn't for: People who are not in a position to spend a lot on a duvet insert or comforter.

Made from ethically-sourced white goose down, the Feathered Friends Bavarian 700 Down Comforter is a great choice for year-round use thanks to its 700 fill power that provides superior insulation while remaining lightweight. Testers described this incredibly plush and lofty comforter as having a hotel-quality feel, noting that it rests very lightly over the body and provides warmth without overheating.

We found the fill to be evenly distributed and quick to return to its original loft after being compressed for several minutes, which is a testament to the high quality of the down. The shell is made from 400-thread-count cotton that feels "satiny smooth," according to testers. And because the fill is made from 100 percent down, there are no quills to poke through the shell. It's also worth noting that it comes with sewn-in fabric loops for attaching a duvet cover.

Most of the coffee stain came out with a damp cloth during our testing, but the comforter may be machine-washed using a down-specific detergent in a large, front-loading washer, according to the manufacturer. Although this is one of the more expensive comforters we tested, we think its price is justified because it uses the highest quality materials available.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Cotton
  • Fill: Down
  • Construction: Box-stitch
  • Fill Power: 700
  • Sizes: Twin, full, queen, king, California king
  • Care: Machine-washable in front-loading washer

Price at time of publish: From $459 for queen

Feathered Friends Bavarian 700 Down Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Down Duvet Insert: Riley White Goose Down Comforter

4.6
Riley White Goose Down Comforter

Riley Home

Who it's for: People who want a genuine down duvet insert that is Responsible Down Standard (RDS) certified.

Who it isn't for: People who want to avoid animal-sourced materials.

This down comforter from Riley is constructed with care using the highest quality materials. The fill is made from Responsible Down Standard (RDS)-certified down, meaning it is humanely sourced and harvested without causing unnecessary harm to animals. The comforter itself has a baffle-box construction, so there's an additional layer of fabric between the top and bottom of the shell to contain the fill, while still allowing it enough room to expand. All of this combined with the high fill power makes this comforter an exceptionally lofty and plush comforter that regulates your body's temperature for year-round use.

We found the comforter to restore its loft in just 30 seconds after being compressed, and it proved to be breathable in our testing, raising just 7 degrees Fahrenheit over five minutes. The Riley White Goose Down Comforter is available in both all-season (which we tested) and extra-warm densities, with fill powers of 700 and 750, respectively. Both come with corner tabs for attaching to a duvet cover.

When we spilled a tablespoon of coffee on the cotton cover, we found it to blot up easily and the stain pen took care of any lingering residue. The brand recommends washing the comforter in a front-loading, commercial washing machine and drying it on low heat—although spot cleaning will be sufficient for small spills.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Cotton
  • Fill: Down
  • Construction: Baffle-box
  • Fill Power: 700
  • Sizes: Twin/twin XL, full/queen, king/California king
  • Care: Machine-washable in front-loading washer

Price at time of publish: From $400 for full/queen

Riley White Goose Down Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Less-Expensive Down Duvet Insert: APSMILE Goose Feather Down Comforter Duvet Insert

4.8
Best Duvet Inserts
Amazon.com

Who it's for: People who want a high-quality down comforter that's less expensive than the competition.

Who it isn't for: People who don't want to worry about feathers poking through the shell of their comforter.

If you prefer the warmth and comfort of a down comforter, this pick from Apsmile is a great budget option. It's made from both quill-less down and quilled feathers, which helps to bring down the price significantly. But keep in mind that you do run the risk of getting poked by quills through the shell. The comforter's shell itself is made from a blend of polyester and cotton, so you get the breathability of cotton with the durability of synthetic fibers. In our testing, the temperature didn't rise at all after five minutes of laying under the comforter.

The duvet insert is constructed with baffle-box stitching, which keeps the fill from shifting and provides more loft. This combined with its 750 fill power makes the comforter extra fluffy, lightweight, and thermoregulating for use in all seasons. (That said, we tested the all-season version, but there are also lightweight and winter-weight options available.) Like the other comforters on our list, this one also comes with corner tabs so you can attach it to a duvet cover.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Polyester-cotton blend
  • Fill: Down and feathers
  • Construction: Baffle-box
  • Fill Power: 750
  • Sizes: Twin, queen, oversized queen, king, oversized king, super king, California king
  • Care: Spot clean or dry clean

Price at time of publish: $239 for queen

Apsmile Goose Feathers Down Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Down-Alternative Duvet Insert: COHOME Cooling Down Alternative Comforter

COHOME Cooling Down Alternative Comforter

COHOME

Who it's for: People who want a warm duvet insert that's easy to clean.

Who it isn't for: People who are set on a real down duvet insert.

Cohome's all-polyester comforter is far less expensive and easier to clean than those made of traditional down. In our testing, we found it to hold up well in the washing machine, and the coffee stain lifted relatively easily. This comforter can even be tumble dried on low heat, too.

Testers described the comforter as very soft, although one person who says they tend to run warm did find it a bit toasty under this duvet. This is often to be expected with down-alternatives, as they require more fill to attain insulation similar to real down.

The Cohome 2100 Series Down-Alternative Comforter is available in plenty of colors, and it comes with corner tabs so it can be used without a duvet cover if needed. We also like that it's available in a wide variety of sizes, including oversized options that offer more coverage. Overall, this down-alternative pick is a great inexpensive option for people who need a warmer comforter—especially in the winter.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Polyester
  • Fill: Polyester
  • Construction: Box-stitch
  • Sizes: Twin/twin XL, full, queen, oversized queen, king, California king, oversized king
  • Care: Machine-washable

Price at time of publish: From $50 for queen

COHOME King 2100 Series Cooling Down Alternative Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Bamboo Duvet Insert: Cozy Earth Bamboo Comforter

4.5
Cozy Earth Bamboo Comforter

Cozy Earth

Who it's for: People who want a duvet insert with temperature-regulating properties of bamboo.

Who it isn't for: People who want something more lightweight.

Cozy Earth, the Oprah-approved bedding and loungewear brand, specializes in all things bamboo. Both the fill and the shell of this comforter are made from viscose derived from bamboo, which has natural temperature-regulating properties and a silky smooth feel. Our testers described this comforter as luxurious, soft, and breathable. However, it does have some significant weight to it—we recorded seven pounds for the version with a standard amount of fill—so keep this in mind if you prefer a lightweight comforter.

In terms of care, Cozy Earth recommends spot cleaning, dry cleaning, or machine washing its comforter on the delicate cycle in a commercial-sized washing machine. During our tests, most of the coffee we spilled came out with a little water and stain remover, although there was still a faint stain afterward. The comforter comes with anchor loops to attach to a duvet cover, or it can be used as a stand-alone cover. It's on the pricier side of those we tested, although it does come with the brand's generous 100-day sleep trial and 10-year warranty.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Viscose from bamboo
  • Fill: Viscose from bamboo
  • Construction: Box-stitch
  • Sizes: Twin, queen/full, king
  • Care: Machine-washable on delicate in commercial-sized washer

Price at time of publish: From $469 for full/queen

Cozy Earth Bamboo Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best Duvet Insert for Hot Sleepers: Buffy Cloud Comforter

4.6
Buffy Cloud Comforter

Buffy

Who it's for: People looking for a down-alternative comforter made from cooling and sustainable materials.

Who it isn't for: People who want to choose between more than one warmth level.

Buffy's Cloud Comforter is lightweight, breathable, and smooth to the touch: "I thought it felt great, held [its] temperature really well, and it was easy to move around and fold," says one tester. The down-alternative fill is made from recycled PET fill, which is Global Recycle Standard (GRS) certified, and the cooling shell is made from Eucalyptus-derived Tencel lyocell, a material made through a sustainable production process in which 99 percent of the water and solvent used during treatment are recycled. Tencel lyocell is also prized for its moisture-wicking, antibacterial, and cooling properties.

In our testing, the comforter remained light and breathable for the duration of testing, as there was plenty of airflow underneath. Plus, the surface temperature rose by only 5 degrees Fahrenheit. However, unlike some of the other duvets on our list, this one does not come in multiple warmth options or fill levels.

The Cloud Comforter is entirely machine-washable, which is especially convenient for people who prefer to wash their bedding more frequently. We also appreciate the brand's generous policies: All Buffy purchases have a 100-night return window, but you can also take advantage of its trial period, which places a temporary hold on your card for seven days, so you can try the comforter at home for a week before actually getting charged for it.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Tencel lyocell
  • Fill: Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
  • Construction: Not listed
  • Sizes: Twin/twin XL, full/queen, king/California king
  • Care: Machine-washable

Price at time of publish: $169 for full/queen

Buffy Cloud Comforter
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Best All-Season Duvet Insert: Casper Down Duvet Insert

4.3
Casper Down Duvet Insert

Casper

Who it's for: People who want a genuine down duvet insert for year-round use.

Who it isn't for: People who want an extra-warm duvet insert or comforter.

If you want a duvet insert that you can use in the winter and the summer, look for one that can regulate its temperature depending on the time of year. The combination of real down and cotton is best at achieving this, and we found this to be true in our testing, too. The Casper Down Duvet has a breathable cotton shell that feels crisp and soft to the touch, as well as a 600 fill power that is just right for all-season use. Plus, the comforter is available in both midweight and lightweight options, depending on your preference (we tested the former).

Additionally, we appreciate that the down is RDS-certified, which proves it has been ethically sourced. And, unlike many real down comforters, this one from Casper is machine-washable and dryer-safe, so cleaning your bedding is a breeze.

Product Details:

  • Cover Material: Cotton
  • Fill: Down
  • Construction: Box-stitch
  • Fill Power: 600
  • Sizes: Twin/twin XL, full/queen, king/California king
  • Care: Machine-washable

Price at time of publish: $299 for full/queen

Casper Down Duvet
Real Simple / Dera Burreson

Final Verdict

Our top pick is the Brooklinen All-Season Down Comforter because it's made with high-quality materials, including genuine down and a breathable cotton shell. It has a baffle-box construction, which gives the fill more room to expand for better thermoregulation. We also like that you can choose from one of three different levels of warmth depending on your sleep preferences.

For a more budget-friendly option, the Utopia Bedding Down-Alternative Comforter is made from a siliconized down-alternative fiber that we found to be breathable and lightweight. Plus, it's entirely machine-washable and can be used as a duvet insert or stand-alone comforter thanks to its many color options.

Our Testing Process

We tested 34 duvet inserts and comforters in our Lab and scored them based on quality, texture, durability, breathability, and value. We began by spreading the duvets out on a bed and performing a visual check for any loose threads or other flaws. Then, we measured the length, width, and weight of each comforter. Our testers ran their hands over each duvet insert to assess its feel and evaluate how evenly the fill was distributed. For down duvet inserts, we checked for any feathers poking through the shell and for any obvious odor coming from the product.

For our next test, we used an infrared thermometer to take the surface temperature from underneath the duvet insert. After laying under the duvet for five minutes, our testers took another surface temperature reading and compared it to the original. While under the duvet, testers also took note of its comfort, loft, and breathability.

To evaluate how easy it is to maneuver the duvet, testers pushed it off the bed and pulled it back up, noting whether the fill shifted around or not. Our testers then lied on top of the comforter for two minutes to compress the loft, taking note of how quickly it restored its original loft. (We found the Feathered Friends Bavarian 700 Down Comforter to be exceptionally lofty and quick to go back to its original loft after being compressed.) We then put covers on the duvet inserts (when applicable) and repeated the above tests, noting whether there was any bunching.

Finally, our testers evaluated the cleanup process for each duvet by pouring one tablespoon of coffee on it and letting it sit for 30 seconds. We then spot-treated the stain and ran the machine-washable duvets through a wash and dry cycle, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After laundering, we inspected the duvets for any change in loft, threading, snags, and pilling. We measured each duvet again and compared it to the original numbers to check for any shrinkage. Once finished, testers received the retail price of the product and scored its value based on its price and performance in our tests. We plan to long-term these duvet inserts and will follow up with new insights once we have them.

How to Shop for Duvet Inserts Like a Pro

Material

Down: Down duvet inserts and comforters are made from the soft, quill-less feathers that come from the underbelly of a goose or duck. Down is prized for its light and plush feel as well as its insulation. "Down feathers expand, allowing air to circulate, which helps with thermoregulation—and it's also very cozy and comfy," says Murray.

You can also find down-and-feather combos (such as the Apsmile Luxurious Goose Duck Feathers and Down Comforter) that contain down feathers and the feathers from the back and wings of the bird, which contain quills. This combination makes for a less-expensive duvet, although down-and-feather duvets are more prone to flattening and the quills may poke through the cover.

Should you choose to go with a down duvet insert or comforter, be sure it comes with a certification for quality and ethical animal practices. Common certifications include the Responsible Down Standard (RDS), Downmark, and the IDFL Down Standard (IDS). You should also be aware that for some people, real down may trigger an allergic reaction.

Down Alternatives: Down-alternative duvets, such as those made from polyester and other synthetic materials, are designed to mimic the feel of real down—making them a great option for allergy sufferers or those who want to avoid animal-sourced materials. They're also less expensive than genuine down. However, down alternatives often require more fill to attain similar insulation to that of real down. This means that some down-alternative duvets can be less breathable, so keep this in mind if you typically sleep warm.

Wool and Silk: Silk is a great lightweight material for warmer months, while wool provides warmth, but is denser and less lofty than down. Both of these materials are natural fibers and make great alternatives to down. Murray says wool is "naturally moisture-wicking, fire-resistant, mold-resistant, and dust mite-resistant," while silk—long-strand mulberry silk, to be specific— is "naturally hypoallergenic, moisture-wicking, breathable, non-irritating, mold-resistant, and mite-resistant."

Shell Material: Even though your duvet insert will be enclosed in a cover, the shell material is still crucial to its feel and performance. "It's important to take note of what the duvet insert is actually covered in," says Murray. Cotton and polyester are the most common. Cotton tends to be more breathable, while polyester is more durable. However, you can find other breathable alternatives, such as those made from eucalyptus-derived Tencel lyocell, bamboo viscose, linen, and more.

Fill Power

A down duvet's "fill power" simply refers to the amount of space that the filling takes up—aka how fluffy it is. A higher fill power (700 and above) will be lighter in weight because a fluffier fill takes up more space and requires less down to fill the same amount of space. Down with a higher fill power will also have superior insulation, making it well-suited for the winter months, too. Note that this measurement is only used for genuine down products, not down-alternative materials.

Box Construction

Duvet inserts and comforters are stitched in ways that keep the filling in place, and the most common styles are baffle-box and box-stitch (aka sewn-through). A baffle-box duvet insert groups wads of the filling into squares, creating a checkerboard design. To do this, strips of fabric are inserted between the top and bottom layers of the shell, which help keep the filling in place. A box stitch duvet insert also creates boxes to contain the fill, however, it doesn't feature the strip of fabric between the top and bottom layers of the shell. Instead, the layers are sewn directly together to create a chamber for the filling.

A baffle-box construction (like that of our best overall pick, the Brooklinen All-Season Down Comforter) is generally considered to be superior because it gives the filling more room to expand, which helps with thermoregulation. The roomier construction provided by baffle-box stitching also ensures that the loft will be higher, creating a fluffier look and feel. The only downside is that baffle-box comforters tend to be more expensive than their box-stitch counterparts.

Care

The fill and shell materials used in your duvet insert will determine how you should wash it, so be sure to always refer to the manufacturer's instructions. According to Murray, down comforters and duvets only need to be washed once every one to two years, barring any spills. Some down comforters are spot-clean or dry-clean only, but for machine-washable down, you can use a gentle detergent or down-specific wash. Just keep in mind that washing both down and down-alternative duvet inserts will likely require a large-capacity machine. And when it comes to drying, using wool dryer balls can help fluff the interior filling as long as your blanket is dryer-safe.

More Duvet Inserts to Consider

Morrow Quilted Down Duvet Insert: This is another buttery-soft duvet insert made from RDS-certified down and a cotton sateen shell. It came in just shy of the competition, mainly because it's priced higher than many similar products.

Bedsure All-Season Down-Alternative Comforter: This pick from Bedsure is another budget-friendly, down-alternative comforter with classic box stitching. At 300 GSM, it's slightly more dense than our best budget pick, which may make it better suited for those who prefer a warmer duvet. We also like that it comes in several different colors, so it can be used as a duvet insert or stand-alone comforter.

Coyuchi Climate Beneficial Wool Duvet Insert: This wool comforter from Coyuchi was very breathable and comfortable in our testing. Wool makes a great alternative to down because, like down, it's a natural fiber, but unlike down, it's fire-, mold-, and dust-mite resistant. Wool is also denser and less lofty than down—but it requires careful attention when washing.

Questions You Might Ask

What's the difference between a duvet insert and a comforter?

Even though you'll find the terms used interchangeably, duvet inserts and comforters technically refer to different products. The major distinction between the two is that a duvet insert is designed to be used with a cover, which means you can go longer between washes. Murray says duvet inserts also tend to be thinner than comforters and more customizable since you can choose both the duvet insert and the cover to your liking. But you can easily use a duvet cover with a comforter, too—in fact, many products marketed as "comforters" are designed to be used with duvet covers.

How do you keep a duvet insert in place?

Anyone with experience using a duvet insert knows that keeping it from bunching up or shifting within its cover can be quite difficult. The first step is looking for duvet inserts that come with ties or button loops to secure them to a cover. "If you don't see them on your duvet insert or cover, you can add them yourself pretty easily going the DIY route," says Murray. "A little needle and thread plus some fabric ribbon [go] a long way."

From there, make sure you know how to properly put on a duvet cover for the most secure fit. And if your duvet insert has ties or buttons that simply aren't cutting it, there's still hope. "A hack I'm currently using on my duvet is to use large safety pins in the corners, as my duvet cover only has ties in two of the four corners," says Derby. "Works like a charm, and I don't feel or notice them at all."

How often should you wash a duvet insert?

Since they have covers, duvet inserts don't need to be washed as often as other types of bedding. You should wash your duvet cover according to the manufacturer's instructions once every one to two weeks. The duvet insert should be washed (or spot- or dry-cleaned) around once a year, assuming there aren't any major messes. For small spills and stains, you can spot-treat your duvet insert as needed.

Take Our Word for It

This article was written by Melanie Fincher, associate commerce editor for Real Simple with over three years of experience writing product reviews and lifestyle content. To come up with this list, we tested 34 duvet inserts and comforters in our Lab and rated them based on quality, texture, durability, breathability, and value. Additionally, we received expert tips on what to look for in a duvet insert from Kelly Murray, a certified pediatric and adult sleep coach, as well as Toussaint Derby, lead designer at Havenly.

What Is Real Simple Selects?

Next to each product on this list, you may have noticed a Real Simple Selects seal of approval. Any product appearing alongside that seal has been vetted by our team—put through tests and graded on its performance to earn a spot on our list. Although we buy most of the products we test, sometimes we do get samples from companies if purchasing a product ourselves isn't an option. If that's the case, we test the product just like we test anything we buy, but we also disclose that we received it for free to be as transparent with you as possible.

Love our recommendations? Check out more products that have earned the Real Simple Selects, from humidifiers to cordless vacuums.

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