Attention all book lovers: The shelfie is the new selfie. 

By Katie Holdefehr
Updated August 29, 2018
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Colson Horton / ADR Creative

While some Instagrammers are all about the daily selfie, the book lovers of social media are all about the shelfie. Showing off images of your curated bookshelves—complete with personal accents, art, and that well-worn copy of Moby Dick—is a trend both bibliophiles and aesthetes can get behind. To learn how to design the ultimate Insta-worthy shelfie, we asked Colson Horton of ADR Creative, a prop stylist and set designer based in Nashville, Tennessee, for her top bookshelf organization tips. Follow her three steps below and you'll be well on your way to a stylish shelfie.

Colson Horton / ADR Creative

1
Color Coordinate Your Books

Naturally, books are the most important post of any shelfie, so pick and arrange them with care. One option is to sort the books by color, to create an ombre or monochromatic look, or stick to a select color palette. "Like colors can make the shelf more organized," Horton explains, which helps not distract the eye.

2
Add Personal Accents

Like a good selfie, a shelfie should show off your personality. Pop in personal touches, like photos that make you laugh, small pieces of art you love, or collectibles you picked up from trips. For this bookshelf, Horton even added an eye-catching patterned wallpaper from New Hat Projects. Remember, a shelfie should reflect your personal style.

Colson Horton / ADR Creative

3
Group Like Objects ... or Space Them Evenly

A stylish bookshelf isn't just about the items you display, but also how you arrange them. On her bookshelf, Horton grouped together an assortment of pretty (and surprisingly affordable!) marble pillar candle holders from Target. One alternative to grouping the objects close together is to space them out evenly along the shelf to create a striking look, as Horton did above. Play with grouping objects close together or spacing them out to find a look you love.