5 Healthy Reasons to Sip Cinnamon Tea

Spoiler: It tastes good and it's good for you.

Consider cinnamon tea your next easy (and delicious) health boost. To make cinnamon tea at home, Tara Coleman, CN, a clinical nutritionist, recommends simmering 1 cinnamon stick in 1 cup of water for 15 minutes. Strain out the cinnamon and enjoy. "Add a slice of lemon and a little honey if you want a sweeter drink," she says. No time to simmer? You can also find cinnamon tea bags at your grocery or online.

The best part about cinnamon tea isn't even how good it tastes. From hydration to anti-inflammation, there are myriad health benefits.

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Cinnamon tea provides serious antioxidants

"Cinnamon tea may offer numerous health benefits, at least in part due to its rich polyphenol antioxidant content," explains LeeAnn Smith Weintraub, MPH, RD, a nutrition counselor and consultant. Polyphenols are micronutrients found in plants that are packed with antioxidant properties, which help protect your cells against damage caused by free radicals, fight inflammation, and prevent disease.

RELATED: 6 Healthy Perks of Sipping Ginger Tea (Iced or Hot), According to RDs

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Reduces inflammation

Cinnamon is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent, and sipping it as tea offers those benefits, too. As one study notes, out of 115 foods tested, Sri Lankan cinnamon was found to be one of the "most potent anti-inflammatory foods." Research published in the Journal of AOAC International found that cinnamon's high volume of phenolic compounds help reduce inflammation in the body.

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Manages blood sugar

Whip up a cup of cinnamon tea to keep your blood sugar even. "[Cinnamon] has a compound that acts similar to insulin and helps move sugar from your blood into the cells," explains Coleman. "It's been shown to help with insulin resistance for up to 12 hours after you drink it."

RELATED: There Are Many Types of Healthy Tea, but These Are the 4 Dietitians Love Most

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Delivers nutrients more quickly

It might sound obvious, but the water in cinnamon tea plays a significant, beneficial role as well, and many additional health perks come from the fact that tea is water-based. For one, water helps nourish your gastrointestinal (GI) tract—so everything flows through your system more easily.

"Many health-promoting compounds in cinnamon are water soluble, and it's safe to say, tea is an optimal way to ingest cinnamon," Weintraub says. Water soluble is just a fancy way of describing something that dissolves in water, making cinnamon tea an ideal way to deliver cinnamon's nutrients to your body.

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Helps hydrate

The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommend that men drink 15 1/2 cups of water a day and women drink 11 1/2 cups of water a day—and don't forget that 1 cup of tea counts as 1 cup of hydration for the day.

RELATED: The Top Heart-Healthy Reasons to Drink More Tea

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  2. NCCIH, Antioxidants: In Depth. Date Accessed June 25, 2022.

  3. Gunawardena D, Karunaweera N, Lee S, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamon (C. zeylanicum and C. cassia) extracts - identification of E-cinnamaldehyde and o-methoxy cinnamaldehyde as the most potent bioactive compoundsFood Funct. 2015;6(3):910-919. doi:10.1039/c4fo00680a

  4. Jiang TA. Health benefits of culinary herbs and spicesJ AOAC Int. 2019;102(2):395-411. doi:10.5740/jaoacint.18-0418

  5. Hamidpour R, Hamidpour M, Hamidpour S, Shahlari M. Cinnamon from the selection of traditional applications to its novel effects on the inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer cells and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and a series of functions such as antioxidant, anticholesterol, antidiabetes, antibacterial, antifungal, nematicidal, acaracidal, and repellent activitiesJ Tradit Complement Med. 2015;5(2):66-70. doi:10.1016/j.jtcme.2014.11.008

  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Your Digestive System & How It Works. Date Accessed June 25, 2022.

  7. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate: Chapter 4: Water. Date Accessed June 25, 2022.

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