Zucchini-and-Mozzarella Frittata

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The wonderful thing about a frittata is its versatility. It can be made with almost any combination of vegetables, eggs, and cheese. In this case, sautéed zucchini and onion add body, blanketed by melted mozzarella cheese. For heat, there’s Espelette pepper, which comes from the Basque region in Spain. However, if you can’t find Espelette at the store, crushed red pepper flakes will stand in just fine. Serve with salad and bread alongside, and turn the leftovers into a wicked breakfast sandwich the next day.

Zucchini-and-Mozzarella Frittata
Photo: Greg DuPree
Hands On Time:
15 mins
Total Time:
30 mins
Yield:
4 serves

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided

  • 1 large zucchini, thinly sliced

  • 1 yellow onion, chopped

  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano leaves

  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

  • 8 large eggs

  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper, plus more for serving

  • 4 ounces fresh mozzarella, cubed (about ¾ cup)

  • Green salad, for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a 10-inch ovenproof skillet over medium. Add zucchini, onion, oregano, and garlic and cook, stirring often, until vegetables are slightly softened, 8 to 10 minutes.

  2. Whisk eggs, salt, and crushed red pepper until combined. Add remaining 2 tablespoons oil to skillet, tilting to distribute. Pour egg mixture over vegetables and shake skillet to help eggs settle. Cook over medium until edges begin to set, 2 to 3 minutes. Top with cheese.

  3. Transfer skillet to oven and cook until top is just set, 13 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly.

  4. Gently slide frittata out of skillet and season with more crushed red pepper. Serve with salad.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

371 Calories
30g Fat
7g Carbs
19g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Calories 371
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 30g 38%
Saturated Fat 9g 45%
Cholesterol 379mg 126%
Sodium 644mg 28%
Total Carbohydrate 7g 3%
Total Sugars 3g
Protein 19g

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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