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Garlicky Pan Con Tomate

All hail the ripe summer tomato, potentially a perfect food. Here, the inside of the tomato is the star: the juicy sweet-tart pulp adorns garlic-rubbed, toasted ciabatta, proving that simple food doesn’t mean boring. The pan con tomate can be the main meal (eat enough of the addictive toast and you’ll definitely get full), or top with tuna, capers, and a hard-boiled egg to make a filling open-faced sandwich. The recipe calls for broiling the ciabatta halves, but it’s worth opting for a grill, if you have one. The delicious charred flavor will accentuate the bright tomato pulp.

Goat Cheese Grits Soufflés

Great recipes can make cooking feel like magic. Think about it: You can mix up everyday ingredients like milk, grits, eggs, and cheese, place them in the oven, and then out comes a voluminous soufflé. It’s witchcraft of the best kind. This recipe makes eight individual soufflés that taste like the lovechild of spoonbread silky grits. Served with bacon, these soufflés are perfect for a brunch, or serve them as the side dish for an elegant dinner party, perhaps with slow-braised lamb and roasted asparagus.

Grits Pudding

You might think of grits being a savory dish served alongside shrimp or eggs, but here they are used in a sweet breakfast that falls somewhere between Cream of Wheat and rice pudding. The grits are cooked in cardamom- and cinnamon-spiced coconut milk, with dried apricots and raisins adding both sweetness and texture. If you’re feeling extra decadent, pour on some heavy cream or more coconut milk on top when serving. Shopping tip: If you can’t find whole cardamom pods, ground cardamom works, too. Plus there’s no need to fish the pods out once you’ve finished the pudding.

Grits Dumplings

Once you’ve tried homemade grits dumplings, you might be wondering what the heck you’ve been doing with your life. They’re like traditional dumplings, but instead of just flour, the bulk of the dry mixture is made of quick-cooking grits. Once you assemble the dumplings, you’ll steam them and then add to any soup or broth you like. This recipe has a pretty simple flavor profile, so it’s easy customize the dumplings to the broth you're planning to use with spices added to the dry mixture, scallions swapped for the onion, or a bit of hot sauce stirred in with the milk.

Zesty Chicken Enchiladas

You might be wondering what, precisely, “zesty” means. We can sum it up for you in a couple of words: super flavor. In Spanish one might say, “que rico!” These cheesy corn tortillas get their punch from a homemade enchilada sauce. Fresh tomatillos, available in supermarkets in the fall, are a star ingredient. If you can’t find them, try using underripe tomatoes and a squeeze of lime juice for a convenient substitute. If you’re used to shaving off time with store-bought sauce (which isn’t bad), don’t give into the temptation; shredded rotisserie chicken is the timesaver here.

The Easiest Way to Make Eggs for a Crowd

We love the idea of breakfast sandwiches for a crowd, but short-order cooks we are not, nor are we interested in becoming. Instead, we figured out a genius way (if we do say so ourselves) to cook two dozen eggs all at once. We whipped them up in a blender so they were nice and evenly emulsified then poured them into a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet. Fifteen minutes later, we topped them with cheese, cut them into squares, and slapped them on a toasted bun. Assembly is fast and easy work for you and a friend, but if you want to keep this casual, you could put the baking sheet out and let folks assemble their own.

Pasta With No-Cook Tomato Sauce

“No-cook” is our favorite summer phrase, because it means the kitchen can stay cool while we prepare a seasonal meal. A variety of flavor-packed ingredients make this sauce a keeper, including sweet summer tomatoes, finely chopped anchovies, chopped garlic, briny kalamata olives, and spicy crushed red pepper flakes. Letting the mixture sit as the pasta cooks allows the flavors to meld and creates an even better sauce. Top with grated Parmesan cheese and lots of fresh basil for a summertime meal you’ll be enjoying again and again. If you’re not a fan of anchovies, try adding capers instead.

Sheet Pan Chicken and Sweet Potatoes

This easy meal uses just one baking sheet. The chicken comes out with delicious crispy skin, which pairs well with crunchy, peppery watercress and crisp, salty bacon. The roasted sweet potatoes add a bit of sweetness to round out the plate. From start to finish, the dinner takes just 30 minutes. And the best part is that 20 minutes of that time are hands-off. For easy cleanup, line your baking sheet with foil. Look for chicken leg quarters in the refrigerator section of your supermarket, next to the rest of the poultry (we prefer 8-oz. free-range chicken quarters). Pair with a light red wine like Gamay.

Basic Pie Crust

Having a go-to pie crust is a surefire way to become a great home baker, so we're here to teach you how to make pie crust from scratch. A great pie shell is both crispy and flaky, and doesn’t shy away from a real-butter flavor. As for the way to get there? It’s all in the (very simple) technique. The food processor does the hard work of getting the butter into the right size pieces, and then all you’ve got to do is mush the dough into disks. Don’t forget to chill the dough! It’s the key to making sure the shell doesn’t shrink too much or lose its shape in the oven.

Brown Butter & Vanilla Pear Pie

Brown butter is a cook’s best friend—it adds richness and depth of flavor to any food it touches. And, thankfully, it’s easy to make. Simply melt butter over medium heat until it smells nutty, and well, delicious. What you’re actually doing is toasting the milk solids that are inside butter, and those are what give brown butter its name. Here, tossed with pears, apples, and vanilla, you get something wonderfully sophisticated and not overly sweet—perfect for impressing guests. If you want to go the extra mile, serve with creme fraiche or lightly-sweetened mascarpone.