Ratatouille

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Nothing says high summer like a batch of fragrant simmering ratatouille on the stove. And since no two ratatouille dishes are exactly the same, you can really make this your own.

Hands On Time:
10 mins
Total Time:
30 mins
Yield:
4 serves

The dish originates from the South of France, where home cooks would toss tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, onions, eggplant, garlic, and herbs into a pot and cook them down to create an irresistible mixture enjoyed hot, cold, on its own, with eggs, over toast, or tossed with pasta.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil

  • 1 onion, thinly sliced

  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced

  • 1 small bay leaf

  • 1 small eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 cups)

  • 1 small zucchini, halved lengthwise and cut into thin slices

  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into slivers

  • 4 plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped (about 1 1/4 cups)

  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

  • ½ cup shredded fresh basil leaves

  • freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Over medium-low heat, add the oil to a large skillet with the onion, garlic, and bay leaf, stirring occasionally, until the onion has softened.

  2. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until the eggplant has softened. Stir in the zucchini, red bell pepper, tomatoes, and salt, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the basil and few grinds of pepper to taste.

    Ratatouille
    This rustic French classic is chock-full of healthy summer veggies, including zucchini, bell peppers, tomatoes, and—of course—eggplant. Get the recipe:RatatouilleRELATED: 5 Brussels Sprouts Salads You’ll Want to Eat Again and Again. Maura McEvoy

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

151 Calories
11g Fat
14g Carbs
3mg Protein
Nutrition Facts
Calories 151
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 11g 14%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 586mg 25%
Total Carbohydrate 14g 5%
Protein 3g
Calcium 41mg 3%
Iron 1mg 6%

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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