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Gochujang Poached Eggs With Feta and Pickled Onions

Thanks to spicy gochujang (a fermented Korean chile paste) and quick-pickled red onions, this isn’t your average shakshuka. Plus, you don’t even have to turn on your oven—the entire dish is cooked right on the stovetop. If you want runny yolks, pull the pan off the heat as soon as the whites are set—it only takes a minute for them to cook through. Finishing the eggs with torn dill and parsley adds fresh flavor and makes for a gorgeous presentation. Serve with warm, fluffy pita or naan for sopping up every last bit of the spicy tomato sauce.

Pepper and Pesto Tortilla Strata

This one-dish recipe has everything delicious about a frittata, but with corn tortillas folded in for a more satisfying heft. Mozzarella, roasted red peppers, and pesto give the strata an fresh, Italian skew. Normally, strata is made with bread, but in this recipe, corn tortillas stand in for a gluten-free alternative. Letting the mixture chill for an hour before baking ensures that the tortillas benefit from a custardy egg texture. Once it’s baked and chilled, you can cut into squares for easy on-the-go breakfast, or turn it into a brunch dish with a pitcher of mimosas and a green salad.

Corn Tortilla Bowls

Ice cream cones meet tortillas in these cinnamon-sugar coated dessert bowls. Corn adds a nutty element to give a salty-sweet bonus to any dessert. The bowls are good for more than just ice cream—you could fill them with fresh fruit and whipped cream or chocolate pudding. Or, to go truly over the top, a sundae of cinnamon ice cream and a drizzle of caramel would taste divine. Bonus tip: If your tortillas are cold from the fridge, warm them up briefly in the microwave. This will make the tortillas more pliable and easy to drape over the muffin cups.

Chicken Piccata With Mushrooms and Brussels Sprouts

This is the kind of dinner recipe that manages to do a lot: it’s satisfyingly rich from a buttery sauce, it gets protein from the chicken, and it hits a cozy, comfort-food pasta note. Even better, there are not one but two vegetables mixed in. What more could you want? To pair with a wine, serve with something light and crisp like Sauvignon Blanc or Gruner Vetliner. If you’re not in the habit of keeping capers on hand, you might find them surprisingly versatile. Toss them into salads, chop and stir into cream cheese for bagels, or toast in a skillet with oil and serve with fish.

Smoked Trout and Beet Salad

Cuban bread is a white bread similar to French and Italian bread, but it has lard in it, making it extra flavorful. If you can’t find it, go for a soft loaf that doesn’t have a thick crust. You’ll turn the torn pieces into toasted bread crumbs and toss with greens, roasted beets, a fresh dill-horseradish vinaigrette, and smoked trout. If you can find pre-cooked beets at your supermarket, you can skip the roasting and just slice those up. They’re more expensive than roasting your own, but sometimes convenience is worth a little extra cost.

Roasted Veggie Open-Faced Sandwiches

Think of this as an Italian sub’s lighter cousin. It’s packed with generous amounts of vegetables, but still has a nice layer of melted cheese to keep it delicious. Even though there’s a fair amount of chopping, broiling the vegetables instead of roasting them cuts down on cooking time. You’ll scoop out the inside of the bread loaf to nestle the vegetables, so save those bread scraps to use in homemade breadcrumbs. If you’re feeling extra hungry and want to bulk up the meal, serve with a cup of soup.

Green Pozole

Hominy is the star ingredient in this hearty Mexican soup. With a flavor similar to that of tangy corn, canned hominy can be found near the canned beans at your supermarket. If you’re lucky enough to find dried hominy, go ahead and prepare it as you would dried beans. And if you can’t find either, it’s okay to substitute the same volume of canned chickpeas. Bone-in chicken thighs get cooked in the soup to enrich store-bought broth with extra flavor. The recipe serves 8, so you might have leftovers. Cool the soup completely, pour into gallon-size freezer bags, and store in the freezer for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight or in a bowl of cold water for 10 minutes. Reheat in a pot over medium until warmed through, 8 to 10 minutes.

Soba Noodle Veggie Bowl With Tahini Dressing

Think of this dish as a build-your-own noodle bowl—set out the components and let your friends or family assemble as they please. In addition to being healthy and completely customizable, it’s pretty, too, thanks to the assortment of vibrant veggies. The star of the meal is the creamy tahini dressing, which is a riff on an Asian-style peanut butter sauce. We love soba noodles for their quick cook time and nutty flavor, but feel free to use whole-wheat spaghetti instead. For added protein, top the bowls with tofu, shredded chicken, or shrimp. Spicy food lovers can top theirs with sliced fresh chile, too.

Crispy Chicken Cutlets With Carrot and Kale Salad

Yes, chicken cutlets are familiar, but this recipe creates golden, crusty, and tender results every time. Plus, the torn lacinato kale and shaved carrot salad adds a modern edge to the crowd-pleasing cutlet. You can prep the salad a day ahead of time: wash, de-stem, and tear the kale. To shave the carrots into ribbons, thoroughly wash and scrub them. Then, using a Y-shaped peeler, shave off thin ribbons of carrot. You can store the ribbons in a bowl of cold water in the refrigerator for up to a day ahead of time. The dressing will also keep overnight in an airtight container.