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Goat Cheese and Mushroom–Stuffed Acorn Squash

One of the main challenges with vegetarian food is making sure a dinner feels hearty enough. Here, you've got an entire half of an acorn squash per serving, stuffed with mushrooms, spinach, bread cubes, and goat cheese. In other words, it’s not shy on flavor, and the portion feels, well, like dinner. Pro tip: If the squash halves seem unsteady on the baking sheet, you can slice off a little of the outside skin to make a flat base. Serve with a crisp white wine like dry Riesling or Vinho Verde.

Our 30 Most Popular Desserts on Pinterest

How do we like to end meals? With sweet treats that are equal parts yummy and easy. These recipes—the most-pinned desserts on our boards—more than satisfy.

Jack-o’-Lantern Rice Kreepies

Did you know that you can mold warm Rice Krispies treats into all sorts of shapes? Ghosts, Goblins, even Jack-o’-Lanterns! We fashioned them into tiny beggars purses and hid leftover Halloween Candy inside. As if the classic marshmallow and cereal combo weren’t enough, kids (and adults) will love the surprise they find inside. To make easy work on shaping the sticky mixture, use damp hands or lightly spray them with non-stick spray. These will keep, tightly wrapped at room temperature, for a couple weeks, but we doubt they’ll last that long.

Easiest Dry-Brine Rub

Head to turkey nirvana with a dry brine that will deliver on crispy flavorful skin and tender meat without the mess of a liquid brine. Follow this formula for epic results. For every 5 pounds of turkey, follow the below recipe.

Raisin Jam Rugelach 

Rugelach can often taste too dry, undermining the point of eating a treat. Not so with crescent rolls, which bake up pillowy and flaky no matter what. Inside is a brandy- and pepper-spiked raisin jam. Spread inside a crescent roll, you’ve got something both sophisticated and delicious. Serving to all ages? The alcohol in the brandy cooks off when you reduce the jam on the stove. Once you’ve got the hang of this jam, try it as a layer between yellow cakes or served alongside scones.

Pear and Rosemary Sangria

Forget the glass of wine this year. Pair your Thanksgiving feast with this refreshing, fall-inspired sangria. This unexpected libation is light and flora (thanks to the addition of St. Germain)l, yet embraces in-season fall produce with slices of pear and a woodsy herb—we prefer rosemary. If you have one, serve the cocktail in a clear pitcher to show off the gorgeous pear and orange slices. Then, garnish each glass with a sprig of rosemary or thyme (you can use either) for a festive, upscale touch that looks like it's straight out of a cocktail bar.

Grouper With Brown Butter Squash

While roasted butternut squash is delicious on its own, the addition of brown butter makes it utterly addictive. If you struggle with removing the veggie’s stringy seeds, take note: the sharp edge and deep well of an everyday ice cream scoop make it an ideal tool for quickly scraping and seeding the squash. The addition of soft, juicy golden raisins contrasts the nuttiness of the brown butter; we added cider vinegar to give it a punch. Paired with crispy seared fish, this is a filling low-fuss meal that’s great for company, but requires very little hands-on time.

Pasta With No-Cook Tomato Sauce

“No-cook” is our favorite summer phrase, because it means the kitchen can stay cool while we prepare a seasonal meal. A variety of flavor-packed ingredients make this sauce a keeper, including sweet summer tomatoes, finely chopped anchovies, chopped garlic, briny kalamata olives, and spicy crushed red pepper flakes. Letting the mixture sit as the pasta cooks allows the flavors to meld and creates an even better sauce. Top with grated Parmesan cheese and lots of fresh basil for a summertime meal you’ll be enjoying again and again. If you’re not a fan of anchovies, try adding capers instead.

Chickpea, Arugula, and Pickled
 Carrot Salad

It’s sadly common to eat a salad for dinner and walk away hungry. Not so here. Quinoa, pistachios and chickpeas pack protein, and roasted carrots add a satisfying heft to each bite. Unfamiliar with za’atar? It’s a Middle Eastern spice blend that contains dried sumac (a berry that has a flavor akin to citrus), sesame, cumin, thyme, oregano, and marjoram. If you can’t find it at your store, mixing together any of these listed spices will get you a similar taste. Use any extra za’atar to season meat and fish, or stir it into your favorite plain hummus.