Jason Schreiber

We dressed up our favorite Black and White Cookie recipe with a super easy spiderweb decoration for a sophisticated non-candy treat. To spin the tidiest web, you’ll want to make sure that the base chocolate icing is completely cool before you pipe on top of it. We like to use an offset spatula to spread the chocolate evenly across the flat side, but a regular old dinner knife works too. If you do a lot of cookie and cake decorating, invest in an inexpensive set of Ateco piping tips. Use a small round tip for the webs here, but if you don’t have one, you can fill a sturdy resealable plastic bag and snip a tiny hole in one corner. That’ll do the trick.
By Jason Schreiber
Did you know that you can mold warm Rice Krispies treats into all sorts of shapes? Ghosts, Goblins, even Jack-o’-Lanterns! We fashioned them into tiny beggars purses and hid leftover Halloween Candy inside. As if the classic marshmallow and cereal combo weren’t enough, kids (and adults) will love the surprise they find inside. To make easy work on shaping the sticky mixture, use damp hands or lightly spray them with non-stick spray. These will keep, tightly wrapped at room temperature, for a couple weeks, but we doubt they’ll last that long.
By Jason Schreiber
Think of pie as a blank canvas for you to paint upon. For this spooky deep dish number we chose a combination of apples and frozen raspberries, but you can use an equal amount of whatever fruit you please. Cranberries would be a nice substitute for the raspberries if a bloody mummy is really what you’re going for. (We were.) The mummified top is pretty forgiving, too. Cut your top dough into strips after rolling—the more imperfect the better—and lay them slightly overlapping on top. Just be sure to leave an opening for the eyes and the mouth.
By Jason Schreiber
Halloween seemed like as good a time as any to trot out another great riff on our classic sugar cookie recipe. Before you get started though, there are a few secrets we think you should know. First, for super clean edges, pop the cookies in the refrigerator or freezer until they're completely firm. This means the butter will take longer to melt and in turn, helps the cookie keep its crisp edge. Now, you can also go off recipe a bit. Ours calls for a whole egg (which helps keep the cookies tender) but you could use 1 egg yolk in its place or omit the egg altogether. Both of these options will make for sharper shapes.
By Jason Schreiber