Heath Goldman headshot
Heath Goldman headshot

Heath Goldman

Heath is a trained chef, recipe developer, and writer. The friend everyone calls when they have an emergency cooking question, Heath has created content for women's lifestyle and food publications for over 10 years. She specializes in instructional cooking articles, features stories, and low-maintenance recipes with big flavor.

Highlights:
* More than a decade of experience writing and editing food articles and developing recipes
* Contributor to national brands like Real Simple, Southern Living, Food and Wine, Food Network, and PureWow
* Extensive cooking experience including: line cook at L'ecole Restaurant in New York, stage at Le Bernardin in New York, pastry chef at Williams College Bakery in Massachusetts, caterer for tens of private events
* Graduate of the French Culinary Institute (now known as Institute Of Culinary Education), a professional culinary arts program that consists of 650 instructional hours
Challah Bread
Rating: Unrated
New!
This holiday season, skip the schlep to the bakery.
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Get the lowdown on a half-dozen varieties of clams.
So you received a box of chocolates—but do you know which filling is which? Use this chocolate guide to figure out which candies you really love.
A quick guide to picking the right pan for the job.
An illustrated guide to common cuts of bacon.
Here's how to transform the humble pantry staple into vibrant meals.
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Sheet Tray Pizzas
Rating: Unrated
4
Make two full pizzas in just 30 minutes. Cook one immediately—and freeze the other for another night.
Universal Pesto Recipe
Rating: Unrated
1
Here’s the thing about pesto: you can use any combination of green things, nuts, and hard cheese to make it—just be sure to stick to this formula so you’re combining ingredients in the right ratio. Pine nuts, for example, are traditional but can be pricey. Try walnuts or a combo of odd nuts you have on hand. We wanted to bring you the best recipe for pesto that exists, so we tested out several steps that are common in pesto recipes, including toasting the nuts and blanching the greens. Toasting the nuts wasn’t worth it: we couldn’t distinguish pesto with toasted nuts from pesto with untoasted nuts. However, blanching the greens not only turned the pesto a vibrant green color but also prevented it from ever turning brown—even after it was frozen.
Sheet Tray Pizzas
Rating: Unrated
4
Make two full pizzas in just 30 minutes. Cook one immediately—and freeze the other for another night.
Universal Pesto Recipe
Rating: Unrated
1
Here’s the thing about pesto: you can use any combination of green things, nuts, and hard cheese to make it—just be sure to stick to this formula so you’re combining ingredients in the right ratio. Pine nuts, for example, are traditional but can be pricey. Try walnuts or a combo of odd nuts you have on hand. We wanted to bring you the best recipe for pesto that exists, so we tested out several steps that are common in pesto recipes, including toasting the nuts and blanching the greens. Toasting the nuts wasn’t worth it: we couldn’t distinguish pesto with toasted nuts from pesto with untoasted nuts. However, blanching the greens not only turned the pesto a vibrant green color but also prevented it from ever turning brown—even after it was frozen.
Hold the toast this a.m. Instead, use your avocados to top this one-skillet vegetarian crowd-pleaser.
It’s hard to beat a delicious, brimming burrito. But delicious burritos that keep well in the freezer might do just that. These “freezer burritos” are stuffed full of crisp-tender shoestring sweet potatoes, fresh tomato-corn salsa, beans, and, of course, cheddar cheese. To make the sweet potatoes you’ll peel them, grate them on the large holes of a box grater, and roast them on sheet trays. Don’t skip the parchment paper, otherwise they’ll stick to the tray. Make sure all of the ingredients are thoroughly cooled before you roll them up to prevent burritos that get soggy in the freezer.
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Lemon Ricotta Cake
Rating: Unrated
3
This sunny yellow cake would be a delightful way to finish off brunch or even start a special breakfast (we won’t tell). It’s a bit like a lemon bar, only super fluffy. Ricotta adds a ton lightness to the custardy base, and the cake topping is crisp and sweet. You can certainly dump all of the ingredients into the baking dish and mix them up in there, but it’s a bit easier to combine them in a big bowl first (it’s just one dirty dish!). Let your baked masterpiece cool completely before scooping it out or cutting into squares.
Oven-Dried Tomatoes
Rating: Unrated
3
Sundried tomatoes can be polarizing. If you’re turned off by their strong and often overly acidic flavor, we get it. It’s not fun when an entire dish is overwhelmed by a single note of tomato flavor, not to mention when that tomato flavor comes in the form of tough and chewy barely rehydrated pieces. That’s why we came up with this DIY version made right in the oven, no Tuscan hillside necessary. They’re super easy to make and the result is pure, deeply concentrated tomato flavor, and not a tomato raisin in sight. If you’re swimming in summer tomatoes, this is a great way to extend their shelf life.
Think of this cake as an easier version of pumpkin pie—baked in a 9x13-inch baking dish instead of a pie crust. In fact, we modified our classic pumpkin pie recipe to create the base of the cake, adding plenty of chopped semi-sweet chocolate so every bite is a creamy combination of custardy pumpkin and melted chocolate. Sweetening the deal, the cakey topping tastes intensely like a molten chocolate cake. You have our full permission to enjoy this dream team (pumpkin and chocolate, that is) all year long, not just around the holidays. It’s so simple you can.
Apple Streusel Dump Cake
Rating: Unrated
New!
To be honest, we’d liken this “cake” to an amped-up mega-delicious apple crisp. The base is made with baking apples, cinnamon, and a squeeze of lemon juice for balance, just like pie filling. In the spirit of dump cakes, the fruit mixture is covered with a crispy topping that you quickly dump together (we added some rolled oats for texture, plus cinnamon and ginger for oomph). For a finishing touch that plays up the dessert’s similarity to apple crisp, we decided to top it off with an extra layer of streusel. And not just any streusel: big, buttery, crunchy crumbs.
Cherry Coconut Dump Cake
Rating: Unrated
2
It’s sweet and sophisticated, simple and speedy: 15 minutes of hands-on time and you’re done (really). There’s nothing not to love about this dessert. If you stash some frozen cherries in the freezer, it can truly become your backpocket sweet treat, because you should have everything else on hand. It’s pretty served straight from the pan, or in big scoops with vanilla ice cream. Dish it up at your next dinner party and no one will ever guess that you dumped all of the ingredients together, stuck it in the oven, and drank a glass of wine while it was baking.
Learn how to make homemade frozen concentrate lemonade so a refreshing lemonade is always within reach.
Beer Cheese Fondue
Rating: Unrated
New!
Gooey melted cheese with a bitter kick is the comfort food of your dreams.
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Gochujang Braised Brisket
Rating: Unrated
New!
This isn't your grandmother's brisket.
Those who celebrate Passover tend to eat brisket a particular way: slowly braised with sweet onions and carrots. But a lot more people are enjoying brisket these days–with a lot more flavor profiles. Here's what to know about this flavorful meat.
Making a dark leafy green salad has never been faster.
No special gadgets are required. 
Cacao nibs might not be as sweet as a piece of milk chocolate, but they are a nutritious way to incorporate more antioxidants into your diet.
Your guide to downright delicious, healthy(ish) open-faced sandwiches.
Decadent Mac and Cheese
Rating: Unrated
481
Unlike most mac and cheese recipes out there, this one doesn’t require you to make a béchamel sauce. Usually béchamel adds an unbeatable creamy, rich consistency but here a bit of evaporated milk thickens the mac and cheese, doing the work for you. Any type of short pasta will work; we used cavatappi because we love its springy coils. Three varieties of cheese might seem excessive, but they’re all necessary (decadent is in this dish’s title for a reason). Gruyere adds complexity, cheddar brings a sharp tang, and American cheese—don’t turn up your nose—adds a gooey, melty, yummy, extra-cheesiness we loved as kids.