What should the No-Obligation Book Club read for November?

Help us choose the No-Obligation Book Club’s next read.

Photo by Andrew Bordwin

Hi, Booklovers!

Whether you pore over the pages during your daily commute, or tackle a few chapters every night before bed, you’ll have a hard time putting this crop of new books down. If you’re a sucker for murder mysteries, try Moriarty’s new novel, and if you prefer honest (and hilarious!) memoirs, give Lawson’s book your vote. All of the authors are known for previous works but not to worry. The reads can stand on their own. So with a bit of downtime coming up (hello, Thanksgiving!), I recommend cozying up with all four—I guarantee they’ll remind you why you fell in love with reading in the first place.

Take a look at the options below and choose your pick by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.8. And don’t forget to join our ongoing discussion on Twitter about the winning books, where you can share your review or thoughts with #RSbookclub.

-Grace Elkus, RealSimple.com Editorial Assistant

The Clasp by Sloane Crosley

Crosley’s fiction debut proves she really can do it all. Inspired by the classic short story “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant, the novel is told from the perspective of three friends in their late twenties, all of whom are navigating their friendship while attempting to figure out the course of their own lives. Crosley’s wit shines through in a hilariously thoughtful manner.

Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson

Known by many as The Blogess and the author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson impresses yet again with her newest book—in which she manages to discuss her battle with mental illness with sensitivity and humor. It is honest, relatable, and downright ridiculous: and encourages us to all unleash our weirdest, quirkiest selves.

M Train by Patti Smith

Illustrated with Smith’s personal Polaroids, M Train is a collection of her musings, memories, and conversational fragments. She sets the scene with her daily routine in Greenwich Village, but the book brings you along on her travels as she recounts her visits to Mexico, Madrid, Tokyo, and more. Smith describes it as a “roadmap to my life”—and it is an exquisitely written, compelling roadmap at that.

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

As you become invested in each of this novel’s key characters, you’ll find yourself caught up in the town’s gossip, secrets, and schoolyard scandals. The book opens with the news that there’s been a murder (or was it an accident?)—and each chapter brings you closer to discovering the truth.