What’s a Good Makeup Trick for an Eyeglass Wearer?

Real Simple answers your questions.

Q. How can I use makeup to help my eyes pop from behind thick-framed glasses?
Jessica Levine
New York, New York

A. Glasses―whether rimless, plastic, or wired framed―can make you feel as if all the focus is on your specs, not your eyes. Tracy Murphy, a New York City makeup artist, recommends these steps for defining and brightening your eyes to bring out this most soulful, yet sometimes hidden, feature.

The prep: Because shadows and dryness can be magnified by thick lenses, prep the skin around your eyes before applying makeup. Use a soothing balm, such as Patricia Wexler Under-Eye Brightening Cream ($29.50, bathandbodyworks.com), to reduce puffiness. Then camouflage dark circles with a stay-put concealer, like Lancôme Effacernes Waterproof Protective Undereye Concealer ($27.50, lancome-usa.com).

The makeup: Next, rub a brick brown–colored liner, like M.A.C Eye Kohl Liner in Costa Riche ($14.50, maccosmetics.com), into the top lash line to define your eyes. “This neutral shade brings out all eye colors,” says Murphy. For extra definition, open your eyes and, from underneath, smudge liner into the roots of the lashes to make them appear fuller. Top the liner and your lids with a sheer wash of shimmery shadow that closely matches your skin tone. “The shimmer will draw light to your eyes,” says Murphy. “You can also sweep an illuminating powder onto the brow bone and right outside each inner eye corner for a similar effect.” Try M.A.C Iridescent Powder/Loose in Silver Dusk ($22, maccosmetics.com). Then curl your lashes and apply a volumizing mascara, like CoverGirl Lash Blast ($8.50 at drugstores) to the top and bottom lashes. To finish the look, Murphy recommends spritzing a brow brush with hair spray, then combing it through your eyebrows to keep unruly hairs in place.

For a more dramatic look for the evening, work a bronze or dark brown shadow into the eye creases and layer on multiple coats of mascara to pump up the lashes. ―Sarah Smith

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