Join our community of Solution Seekers!

How to Treat and Prevent Varicose Veins

Learn what causes varicose veins, plus easy ways to mask them.

By Jolene Edgar
LegsElinor Carucci

 

For more long-lasting removal, your dermatologist can perform sclerotherapy on spider veins and smaller varicose veins. The procedure involves injecting the offending vessels with a detergent-based solution, which irritates their linings, causing the veins to close and eventually disappear. Typically, you feel pain as the needle goes in. However, a new solution, called Asclera, approved last year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, may take away that sting. “The substance has anesthetic properties,” says Weiss. Sclerotherapy isn’t cheap. You’ll need about two to six treatments at $250 to $500 a pop, which insurance generally doesn’t cover. To quickly cover post-sclerotherapy bruising—and even tiny veins—try Sally Hansen Airbrush Legs ($14 at drugstores).

Large varicose veins call for more aggressive treatment: endovenous laser ablation. A doctor inserts a laser fiber or radiofrequency catheter into the damaged vein to destroy it. This onetime treatment costs about $5,000, but it is often covered by insurance, since in rare cases varicose veins can cause blood clots and ulcers.


Both sclerotherapy and laser ablation may cause some bruising. To minimize this, avoid taking anything that can thin your blood, like aspirin, Motrin, or gingko, for one week before your appointment. Hirsch says that eating pineapple for a few days beforehand may also help, since “the fruit contains an enzyme called bromelain, which may help minimize swelling.”

 

 

 

Read More About:Preventative Health

Related Content

Toddler pulling things off bookcase onto floor

How to Break Kids’ Bad Habits

Your kids’ little quirks make you, well, want to start biting your nails. Help them overcome unseemly behaviors with some expert advice.

What do you think about this article? Share your own solutions and ideas

View Earlier Comments
Advertisement

Quick Tip

Nuts

Juice may serve up vitamins, but it won’t do much to ease hunger: Unlike solid foods, liquids don’t trip the brain’s satiety mechanism. For a more effective snack, pair a glass of 100 percent juice with a few nuts. Get more tips.