Do You Really Have to Eat Breakfast Every Day?

It's time to decide whether a sugary meal is better than none at all. 

easy-doughnuts-recipe
Photo by Yunhee Kim

This article originally appeared on MIMI.

We have all been there: You're running late to work and there's a morning meeting about to start. Do you grab the ever-enticing glazed doughnut in the center of the conference table or do you power through until lunch?

Frankly, I'd go with the doughnut, but I've got a sweet tooth that could rival Willy Wonka's and I'm no nutritionist.

"When we skip breakfast, we are actually doing a major disservice to our bodies," says Maya Bach, LDN, owner of Chicago's River North Nutrition. "Your body is 'fasting' all night, so in the morning, your body needs fuel to start revving up our metabolism. And without food as fuel, our bodies aren't able to function at peak performance."

Right, but if we can hold off, should we?

While the National Weight Control Registry has found that 78 percent of folks who have lost weight and managed to keep it off eat breakfast every day, we're still considering that our only option is a sugary doughnut.

"While a doughnut isn't the ideal fuel for your body, it will at least jump-start your metabolism, helping your body and brain get moving," says Bach. "If you eat nothing, chances are you will feel tired, sluggish, and have low energy throughout your morning."

Great, so I can rationalize doughnuts make a perfectly fine breakfast.

Not so fast.

If all you're trying to do is satisfy a sugar craving, pass up the sweet treat (no matter how painful). If you're not hungry in the morning, that's fine. Eating a nutritious and healthy breakfast is important, but if the hunger pangs aren't there, give it a rest. If you aren't truly hungry and all you see in front of you is a way to pass the time, the doughnut will do nothing for you. Wait until something more nutritious comes your way.