Organic Food Guide

Preserving Summer Produce

Use these easy recipes and freezing tips to make the most of summer produce both now and in the fall.

Summer produce on cutting boardLisa Cohen

Tomatoes

How to freeze them: You can't toss fresh tomatoes in the freezer and expect great results, but you can freeze tomato sauce for later. Ladle the cooled sauce (without the pasta) into resealable plastic bags, filling each halfway. Lay the bags flat on a baking sheet, freeze until solid, then stand the bags upright. Store for up to 3 months. To reheat the sauce, thaw it in a microwave on low heat or in the refrigerator overnight. Transfer to a saucepan, cover, and warm over medium-low heat for about 20 minutes.


Corn

How to freeze it: Break each ear of uncooked sweet corn in half, then stand each half on end in a baking dish or large bowl. With a paring knife, slice downward to remove the kernels from the cob. Transfer the kernels to a container or resealable plastic bag and freeze for up to 3 months.


Plums

How to freeze them: Rinse the plums and pat dry. Do not peel. Cut each one in half, discarding the pits. Slice the fruit into wedges about 1/2 inch thick. Transfer to a container or resealable plastic bag and freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, place the container on a counter for 1 to 2 hours or rinse quickly under cool water. Pat the plums dry. Use immediately after thawing.


Peaches

How to freeze them: Rinse the peaches and pat dry. Do not peel them. Cut each one in half, discarding the pits. Slice the fruit into wedges about 1/2 inch thick. Transfer to a container or resealable plastic bag and freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, place the container on a counter for 1 to 2 hours or rinse quickly under cool water. Pat the peaches dry. Use immediately after thawing. 


More Recipes

For more ways to extend the tastes of summer well into the colder months, see Recipes for Frozen Summer Produce.
Read More About:Freezing

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Fish on butcher paper

The size of fish fillets varies from market to market. A good rule of thumb is to count on 6 ounces per person.