Here’s What Happened When We Put Puff Pastry in the Waffle Iron

It didn’t go as planned.

puff-pastry-waffle
Photo by Grace Elkus

On one of our regular Facebook Live series called “Is It Real Simple?”, we test the craziest food trends spotted across the Internet. We tried the avocado burger bun, made gluten-free bread in a blender, and found success in the three-layer magic cake. The best part? We try it all for the first time live—so our reactions (and the food) are as real as it gets.

This past week, we put on a breakfast-themed show, complete with three hacks that have been dominating our social feeds. We cooked frozen waffles on the stovetop, made mini cinnamon rolls out of crescent roll dough, and wrapped up the episode by putting puff pastry in our waffle iron. Many foodies had raved about the croffle (or is it a puffle?) claiming it created a flaky, buttery croissant-like waffle (no batter necessary). In fact, out of every item Food Network put in their waffle iron, they found the most success with sheets of puff pastry. It didn’t take much to convince us to try it—after all, what's not to like?

As it turns out, puff pastry alone will not a good croffle make. Our first attempt, in which we put a rolled-out puff pastry sheet in a heated waffle iron until golden brown, turned out dry and unimpressive. It needed something, anything, to give it some life (and flavor). Naturally, we turned to chocolate chips. This time, we put our sheet of puff pastry in the waffle iron (trimmed to fit), placed chocolate chips on one half, then folded the sheet over into a triangle and pinched the ends shut.

This attempt was much tastier, but still a bit lackluster. The chocolate chips didn’t melt entirely, and the waffle still needed some type of dipping sauce. Our third attempt? A savory creation—puff pastry filled with shredded Monterey Jack cheese, then placed in the iron to create a grilled cheese. This one was the best (especially the crispy, cheesy edges), but still begged for ranch sauce or tomato soup for dunking.

All in all, our conclusion is this: If you're going to make waffles, stick to the original. They're cheaper and tastier—and only take 20 minutes to whip up. Plus, you can use your puff pastry to make delicious cookies instead. And if you really want to try a croffle, be our guest—just be sure to stuff it with some type of filling and have a dipping sauce at the ready.