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Turkey With Molasses Butter

Turkey With Molasses Butter
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Serves 8| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 10- to 12-pound turkey

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350° F.
  2. In a bowl, use a fork or wooden spoon to combine 8 tablespoons of the butter, the molasses, salt, pepper, and lemon juice; set aside. Remove the turkey giblets and discard or reserve for another use. Rinse the turkey under cool running water. Pat completely dry with paper towels. Place on a rack in a roasting pan. Using your fingers, carefully spread the butter mixture evenly under the skin, reaching in as far as possible without ripping it. Place any remaining butter mixture in the cavity. Rub the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter on top of the skin. Add about 1 cup of water to the pan.
  3. Roast, uncovered, until browned, about 45 minutes. Cover loosely with a large sheet of foil. Continue to roast until a thermometer inserted in a thigh registers 180° F, 2 1/2 to 3 hours total, depending on the size of the turkey. Let stand, covered, for at least 30 minutes before slicing.
By November, 2005

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 637.03Calories From Fat 49%
  • Calcium 87.85mg
  • Carbohydrate 4.54g
  • Cholesterol 272.46mg
  • Fat 34.78g
  • Fiber 0.61g
  • Iron 6.03mg
  • Protein 72.55mg
  • Sat Fat 13.71g
  • Sodium 1398.47mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Molasses-Roasted Pork
The molasses butter gives the turkey a rich flavor and a burnished color. No gravy required.

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