Join our community of Solution Seekers!

Pork Chops and Mashed Potatoes

Pork Chops and Mashed Potatoes
five_whole_stars
Click a Star to Rate This Recipe
Serves 6| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Place the potatoes in a pot. Add cold water to cover; bring to a boil. Add 1 teaspoon salt, reduce heat, and simmer until tender, 15 to 18 minutes. Drain and return potatoes to the pot. Add the buttermilk, 4 tablespoons butter, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, and nutmeg. Mash. Set aside, keeping warm.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season the pork with 1 ½ teaspoons salt, ¼ teaspoon pepper, and paprika. Cook until browned, 3 minutes per side.
  3. Cover skillet, reduce heat to medium, and cook until cooked through, about 6 to 8 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, melt the remaining butter in another skillet over medium heat. Add onion the and garlic; cook until softened, 3 to 4 minutes.
  5. Add the mushrooms and cook until they release their liquid and begin to brown, about 8 minutes. Add the wine, thyme, and zest; simmer until liquid has nearly evaporated, 3 to 4 minutes.
  6. Add the broth, cream, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sauce lightly coats the back of a spoon. Serve with the pork, mashed potatoes, lemon wedges, and romaine.
By March, 2005

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 673Calories From Fat 321
  • Fat 36g
  • Sat Fat 19g
  • Cholesterol 143mg
  • Sodium 1,223mg
  • Protein 35g
  • Carbohydrate 52g
  • Sugar 6g
  • Fiber 5g
  • Iron 4mg
  • Calcium 145mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Pan
For a crisp, delicious sear on meat, avoid using a nonstick skillet. The coating prevents the formation of a caramelized crust.

Did you try this recipe? How did you like it?

View Earlier Comments

What's on Your Plate?

    Advertisement
    Cranberries

    FRESH PICK

    Cranberries

    High in vitamin C, these hard, tart berries are grown in bogs in colder regions of North America and Europe. They’re almost always eaten cooked, as in the classic Thanksgiving relish.