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Moroccan Pork Kebabs

Moroccan Pork Kebabs
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Serves 4| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Heat toaster oven to 425° F.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the orange juice, tomato paste, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, 2 tablespoons of the oil, 1 teaspoon of the salt, and 1/2 teaspoon of the pepper. Add the pork and toss. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 8 hours.
  3. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the eggplant, onion, and the remaining oil, salt, and pepper. Place the vegetables on skewers, alternating eggplant and onion.
  4. Transfer the skewers to a foil-lined toaster-oven baking tray. Bake for 20 minutes. Turn the vegetables.
  5. Place the pork on skewers and add them to the tray. Bake until the vegetables are tender and the pork is cooked through, turning the pork and vegetables once, about 25 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, wrap the bread in foil and place on top of the pork during the last 5 minutes. Transfer the skewers and bread to individual plates. Spoon the tzatziki (if using) on the side and sprinkle with the cucumber and mint.
By September, 2006

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 375Calories From Fat 50%
  • Fat 21g
  • Sat Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 0mg
  • Sodium 439mg
  • Carbohydrate 10g
  • Fiber 5g
  • Sugar 4g
  • Protein 36g
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Food thermometer
Cooking pork to an internal temperature of 150° F (before resting) yields a perfectly cooked and juicy finished product (a slight trace of pink is fine). This is a high enough temperature to kill the bacteria trichinosis, which only affects 1 percent of hogs in the United States.

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