Join our community of Solution Seekers!

Leg of Lamb With Fennel

Leg of Lamb With Fennel
five_whole_stars
Click a Star to Rate This Recipe
Serves 6| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 450° F. Drop the garlic into a food processor with the motor running and the knife blade in place and process until finely chopped. Add the rosemary, fennel seeds, 1 teaspoon each of salt and pepper, and 3 tablespoons of the olive oil and pulse to make a paste.
  2. Cut 10 slits in the lamb, about 1/2 inch deep. Push some of the garlic paste into the slits and rub the remaining paste all over the lamb. Place the lamb in a small roasting pan and set aside.
  3. Remove the stalks and tough outer leaves from the fennel bulbs and cut each into eighths. In a shallow baking pan, combine the fennel and onions with the remaining salt, pepper, and oil, and toss to coat well.
  4. Place the lamb and vegetables in the oven, roast for 1 hour, then remove. Cover the vegetables with foil to keep warm.
  5. Check the internal temperature of the lamb with an instant-read thermometer. Continue roasting until it reaches 130° F for medium-rare, or 135° to 145° F for medium, checking every 10 minutes.
  6. Remove the lamb from oven, transfer to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 15 to 20 minutes.
  7. Heat the roasting pan over medium-high heat. Add the wine and scrape up any browned bits on the bottom. Boil until reduced by half, about 2 minutes. Add the broth and juice and boil until reduced to about 1 cup, about 4 to 5 minutes more. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper.
  8. Carve the lamb into thin slices and place on a platter with the vegetables. Serve with the sauce.
     
By April, 2001

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 820
  • Fat 33g
  • Sat Fat 9g
  • Cholesterol 290mg
  • Sodium 1030mg
  • Protein 98g
  • Carbohydrate 26g
  • Sugar 6g
  • Fiber 7g
  • Iron 10mg
  • Calcium 154mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Corn on the cob
American lamb, because it is corn fed, is milder in flavor than Australian or New Zealand lamb, which is grass fed.

Did you try this recipe? How did you like it?

View Earlier Comments

What's on Your Plate?

    Advertisement
    Cranberries

    FRESH PICK

    Cranberries

    High in vitamin C, these hard, tart berries are grown in bogs in colder regions of North America and Europe. They’re almost always eaten cooked, as in the classic Thanksgiving relish.