Join our community of Solution Seekers!

Graham Cracker Pie

Graham Cracker Pie
five_whole_stars
Click a Star to Rate This Recipe
Serves 8| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400° F. Mix the graham cracker crumbs, butter, and 1/2 cup of the sugar in a bowl. Set aside 1/2 cup of the graham cracker mixture. Add the remaining mixture to a deep pie plate or pan and press into place using the back of a large spoon. Bake the crust for 6 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside. 
  2. Heat 1 3/4 cups of the milk in a medium saucepan until just boiling; lower heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix another 1/2 cup of the sugar with the cornstarch and the remaining milk. Gradually whisk the mixture into the hot milk and cook until creamy, about 2 minutes. Stir a small amount of the hot milk mixture into the egg yolks; add this back into the mixture. Stir constantly for 1 to 2 minutes or until the custard has thickened. Remove from heat and let cool.
  3. While the custard is cooling, beat the egg whites with 1 tablespoon sugar until stiff. Stir the vanilla into the cooled custard and pour into the graham cracker pie shell. Gently spread the egg-white mixture over the top of the custard. Sprinkle with the remaining graham cracker mixture and place in a 400° F oven for 2 minutes or until the meringue is slightly browned.
  4. Chill at least 4 hours before serving.
By October, 2004

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 368
  • Calcium 88mg
  • Carbohydrate 48g
  • Cholesterol 116mg
  • Fat 17g
  • Fiber 1g
  • Iron 1mg
  • Protein 6mg
  • Sat Fat 9g
  • Sodium 180mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Cracked eggshells
As with produce, take eggs and milk from the back of the case; older merchandise tends to be pushed forward.

Did you try this recipe? How did you like it?

View Earlier Comments

What's on Your Plate?

    Advertisement
    Cranberries

    FRESH PICK

    Cranberries

    High in vitamin C, these hard, tart berries are grown in bogs in colder regions of North America and Europe. They’re almost always eaten cooked, as in the classic Thanksgiving relish.