Join our community of Solution Seekers!

Garlicky Hoisin Beef

Garlicky Hoisin Beef
five_whole_stars
Click a Star to Rate This Recipe
Serves 4| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Cook the rice according to the package directions. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the hoisin sauce, ½ cup water, soy sauce, and sugar.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat 1½ tablespoons oil over medium-high heat for 30 seconds. Add the scallions, garlic, and red pepper (if using) and cook until fragrant, about 15 seconds. Add the hoisin mixture and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens slightly, about 1½ minutes. Pour into a bowl. Set aside.
  3. Heat a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add 2 tablespoons oil and heat for 30 seconds. Add the steak and stir-fry until cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate.
  4. Wipe out pan. Reduce heat to medium-high. Add the remaining ½ tablespoon oil and heat for 30 seconds. Add the bell pepper and cook, stirring con-stantly, for 10 seconds. Add the sweet potato and ⅓ cup water. Cover partially and cook, stirring occasionally, for 7 minutes. Add the peas and scallions; cook for 1 minute.
  5. Increase heat to high. Add the sauce. When it starts to bubble, add the steak. Stir-fry until warmed through, about 1 minute. Serve immediately over rice.
By October, 2005

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 463.88Calories From Fat 42%
  • Calcium 76.25mg
  • Carbohydrate 39.15g
  • Cholesterol 46mg
  • Fat 22.13g
  • Fiber 4.34g
  • Iron 3.59mg
  • Protein 27.25mg
  • Sat Fat 4.94g
  • Sodium 1213.56mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Freezer
To easily slice flank steak, firm it up in the freezer for 15 to 30 minutes first.

Did you try this recipe? How did you like it?

View Earlier Comments

What's on Your Plate?

    Advertisement
    Cranberries

    FRESH PICK

    Cranberries

    High in vitamin C, these hard, tart berries are grown in bogs in colder regions of North America and Europe. They’re almost always eaten cooked, as in the classic Thanksgiving relish.