Buttermilk-Cheese Scones

Buttermilk-Cheese Scones
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Serves 12| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 cup shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
  • 1 1/4 cups buttermilk

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 400° F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with vegetable cooking spray.
  2. In a food processor, combine the flour, baking powder, and butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Transfer to a large bowl and add the 2 cheeses, thyme, hot pepper flakes, and buttermilk. Stir until the mixture sticks together. (It will be slightly crumbly.)
  3. Transfer the dough to a work surface and knead gently until it comes together, about 30 seconds. Shape the dough to form an even, flat round about 1 inch thick. Cut the dough into 12 wedges. Place them about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet.
  4. Bake until the scones are light golden brown, 18 to 20 minutes. Remove with a metal spatula. These are best served fresh but can be made up to 2 days ahead. Wrap in foil and reheat in a 250° F oven for 10 minutes. Store in an airtight container.
     
By December, 2001

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 201
  • Calcium 187mg
  • Carbohydrate 25g
  • Cholesterol 21mg
  • Fat 7g
  • Fiber 1g
  • Iron 2mg
  • Protein 8mg
  • Sat Fat 4g
  • Sodium 150mg
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

A variety of cheeses
Use a vegetable peeler to create fancy curls of cheese. It's an elegant presentation, and the flavor is more intense than that of shredded cheese.

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