Blueberry Tart

Blueberry Tart
five_whole_stars
Click a Star to Rate This Recipe
Serves 8| Hands-On Time: | Total Time:

Ingredients

  • flour for the work surface
  • 1 8-ounce sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • large egg, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 tablespoons confectioners' sugar
  • 2 cups blueberries

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 375° F. On a lightly floured surface, unfold the sheet of pastry and roll it into a 10-by-12-inch rectangle. Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  2. Using the tip of a knife, score a 1-inch border around the pastry without cutting all the way through. Brush the border with the egg and sprinkle with the granulated sugar. Bake until golden and puffed, 18 to 22 minutes.
  3. Using the tip of a knife, rescore the border of the cooked pastry without cutting all the way through. Gently press down on the center of the pastry sheet to flatten it. Let cool to room temperature, 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, with an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese until smooth. Add the cream, lemon zest, and 2 tablespoons of the confectioners’ sugar and beat until smooth. Spread the cream cheese mixture evenly within the borders of the pastry.
  5. Arrange the blueberries in a single layer over the filling and sprinkle with the remaining tablespoon of confectioners’ sugar.
By August, 2009

Nutritional Information

  • Per Serving
  • Calories 250
  • Fat 17g
  • Sat Fat 7g
  • Cholesterol 52mg
  • Sodium 207mg
  • Protein 5g
  • Carbohydrate 21g
  • Fiber 2g
What does this mean? See Nutrition 101 .

Quick Tip

Blueberries, blackberries, raspberries
Blackberries and raspberries should be deeply colored; blueberries should have a slight frosty-white cast.

Did you try this recipe? How did you like it?

View Earlier Comments

What's on Your Plate?

    Advertisement
    Cranberries

    FRESH PICK

    Cranberries

    High in vitamin C, these hard, tart berries are grown in bogs in colder regions of North America and Europe. They’re almost always eaten cooked, as in the classic Thanksgiving relish.